Mechanics

2000 TOYOTA CAMRY CE 4CYL

1999 Daewoo Lanos • 4 cylinder FWD Automatic • 98,000 miles

I really need help please, car heats up I checked fuses and realays they all seem good, so went ahead and replaced the fan sweatch and coolant temp sensos beacause radiator dont never turn on unless I turn on the heater, I posted I pic of the sensors I replced, well this did not fix the problem. Then I noticed a noise arount the area of the timing belt and water pump, I went ahead and replaced both oh and also thermostat, did not fix the overheating problem either. Water pump and thermostat were replaces not too long before I did it, they put the green antifreeze the person who did the job before I did, I read you have to use the red one for this cars which is silicate and borete free which not many stores have only dealer ship.
So I also noticed as I was flushing the cooling system I noticed coolant does not flow back to the radiator through the top hose which is also shown in the pic I uploaded. I disconected the top hose from radiator with just water in the radiator and water never came from the hose, not even when the temp gauge was almost at the red mark, the fand never turned or either as I had the car on. Im guessing the thermostat is not opening or the cooling ducts in the engine are clogged. Please Help!
Avatar
Datbabyboy687
February 28, 2011.



As near as I can tell it does sound like the thermostat is stuck closed. Coolant will not flow through it. If the hot coolant can't reach the temperature switch the fan won't turn on either.

Caradiodoc
Feb 28, 2011.
So what do you suggest? This is the second new thermostat.

Tiny
Datbabyboy687
Feb 28, 2011.
You mentioned that no water was flowing through the upper radiator hose when the engine temperature was real high. That says the thermostat is not opening. Is it possible you put it in upside-down? Or could the gasket have laid over it and is blocking it from opening?

You could also have a trapped air pocket under the thermostat. It will not open in the presence of hot air. The sensing element must be hit with hot coolant for it to open. Look near the housing for any threaded plug or temperature sensor on the engine side of the thermostat, not on the radiator hose side. Remove anything that will let the air come out as you continue to fill the radiator.

Look at your old thermostat to see if there is a tiny bleed hole in it, usually with a little weight swinging in it. That is to help the coolant flow from where it is already hot to the thermostat to get the heat to it faster. That bleed hole also helps the trapped air get out and go to the radiator. Many new thermostats don't have that bleed hole. Drilling a 1/16" hole in it solved that problem on my van.

Caradiodoc
Feb 28, 2011.
Yes I'm leanning more toward that air pocket I was reading some more and it might be that I'm just not bleeding g the system right, I will check in to that and see if it work thanks for your input I'll let you know what happens.

Tiny
Datbabyboy687
Feb 28, 2011.
So I tried to bleed the coolant system, did not work, I know for sure that is the problem tho, I filled the radiator with just water to flush it at first but water never ciculates, even with the car heating up all the way, so I did some more research and found out that this car originally comes with a thermostat that has a "jiggle valve" which is suppose to bleed out the system, my guess is that this may be the issue cuz the thermostat that I replaced did not have the jiggle valve, and neither does the one that I just put on new? My question is, is this jiggle valve really impotant specially when it comes with it from dealer? What do you think? I will get the one with a jiggle valve and see what happens, looks like this is my last option.

Tiny
Datbabyboy687
Mar 1, 2011.
Yes, it's necessary. After working perfectly fine for years, my '88 Grand Caravan suddenly developed a problem where after driving about five miles on the highway, the temperature gauge would go almost to maximum, sit there a few seconds, then drop down to cold and slowly come back up. It would do that three or four times before it finally smoothed out and stayed in the normal range. It did that for months. It dropped to cold when the thermostat finally opened and cold coolant came rushing in from the radiator. That would cause the thermostat to close again. Finally I had one of my students take the thermostat out and I drilled a 1/16" hole in it. That solved the problem, and today, about five years later, it is still working fine.

The reason for the wide range of fluctuation is the sensor for the gauge on the dash is not real close to the thermostat. It sees the rise in temperature long before that heat gets to the thermostat. With the bleed hole, the coolant can circulate very slowly before the thermostat opens. That allows the hot coolant to migrate over to the thermostat faster.

What you can try first instead of replacing the thermostat is to just remove it, then fill the radiator. When the coolant appears in the thermostat opening you can reinstall it and there will be very little trapped air behind it. The problem is though you will run into the same bleeding problem the next time the system is drained and refilled.

Caradiodoc
Mar 1, 2011.
Yea so that's got to be it then. But you know I just rather put in the right part so I'm just gonna go get it from the dealer, but thanks real good info you provided I'm sure that is the problem then and I'll let you know what happens.

Tiny
Datbabyboy687
Mar 1, 2011.
So that did not work, I put an OE thesmostat with the jiggle valve at 12 o' clock position and burped the system with funnel kit, I'm frustated now! It still heats up slowly but it'll go down if I start the AC or the heater with recycle air botton on. I was looking around the engine to see idfthere ia bleed valve and I found something that looks like a bleed valve behind the engine block not the head, it looks like is right at the level of the pistons, do you think the is a bleed valve to the coolant system?

Tiny
Datbabyboy687
Mar 6, 2011.
Can't say for sure but bleeder screws normally are in places where they are easy to see and access. A different plan of attack would be to connect a scanner that can display live sensor data to see what temperature the cooling system is running at. The electric radiator fan should turn on no higher than 210 degrees. Since the fan comes on and the temperature comes down when you select AC, it suggests the Engine Computer isn't seeing the correct temperature or it is not turning on the radiator fan relay.

Caradiodoc
Mar 6, 2011.
No that is what I noticed to fans never turn on. Not even when I turn the AC or heater on, I the fans work because I powered then directly and they turn on.

Tiny
Datbabyboy687
Mar 7, 2011.