Mechanics

I HAVE A LASABRE WITH 183,000 MILES IT'S LEAKING OIL BAD. WHEN THE CAR IS IDLING IT LEAKS. AND WENTHE CAR IS OFF. I CAME OUT THE NEXT MORNING ENGINE WAS BONE DRY. I POUR OIL IN AND IT CAME RIGHT OUT IN A STEADY STREAM FROM THE PASSENGER SIDE BE

1998 Buick Lesabre • 183,274 miles


Pours out when I put oil in it. Everytime I wanna drive the car I have to put oil in it and like 10mins later all the oil is on the ground or in a steady stream from me driving what can be the problem
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Rob 817
May 24, 2012.




You know we can't see it over a computer, but if the engine has to be running for the leak to occur, the most common causes are a leaking oil pressure sending unit, double gasket on the oil filter or it's loose, or, depending on which engine you have, a leaking camshaft seal. There are lots of other things that can leak oil but typically they don't leak that fast. Have someone take a peek at it.

Caradiodoc
May 24, 2012.
Clean your engine than put a little bottle of engine dye in.U drve aprox.500 miles. Than they put a blacklite on it you see where it coming out.

Cadieman
May 24, 2012.
Wen the car is off I pour 1qt in it and it leaks rite out. Passenger side right.

Tiny
Rob 817
May 24, 2012.
If it leaks out without the engine running, there's a hole in the oil pan. That's not serious, ... Yet, but it can become expensive if internal damage occurs. Engines will run without oil about as long as a body will run without blood.

Caradiodoc
May 24, 2012.
Well in my case the car would start smoking and stall on me went I run outof oil

Tiny
Rob 817
May 24, 2012.
Okay so I went outside this morning started the car up look under it and oil was pouring out in a steady stream while the engine was running its coming from beside the oil filter but wen I shut of the car it drips steady then slows to a crawl is this a major fix.

Tiny
Rob 817
May 24, 2012.
Your filter is bad or the filter adapter or lines are leaking. Clean the area. Have some1 start the car so u can get under the car and see where its coming from. Then come back

Cadieman
May 24, 2012.
You're getting conflicting advice because you're providing confusing details. It only leaks with the engine running. It leaks while pouring in oil and the engine is not running. You shouldn't even be wasting your time typing on the computer. This should have been handled by a professional a long time ago. Loss of oil is not something to fiddle around with. It will turn serious real quickly, and it sounds like you've already done some engine damage if it's stalling.

These are the kinds of leaks mechanics love because they're real easy to find. Dye is for extremely slow leaks that take hours or days to show up, and the residue spreads around making the source of the leak nearly impossible to find. That's not the case here. Cadieman is right about the oil filter. The gasket from the last one could have stuck in place when the new filter was installed. That's called "double-gasketing" and it happens to all of us sooner or later. The new gasket is held in place by a ridge on the filter. Nothing holds the old gasket in place so it blows out from the oil pressure. The oil will only leak when the engine is running because that's when the oil pump is pushing oil, under pressure, to the filter. There are a lot of passages taking that oil to critical places in the engine. It's the oil running out of those passages that makes it continue running out after you stop the engine. You'll lose up to another half quart after the engine is stopped, and it will continue to drip for hours after that.

The only thing you can do is to try turning the oil filter clockwise to see if it's loose. If it is, turn it as tight as you can get it by hand. If it already seems tight, unscrew it counter-clockwise to remove it, then look on the unpainted mounting surface to see if the large square rubber o-ring gasket is in place. If it is, look for a second one sticking to the engine. If you see one on the engine, remove it and throw it away, then put the filter back on.

If the gasket and tightness isn't the issue, examine the crimp in the filter housing to see if part of it has separated creating a hole. If it has, you have a problem with the oil pump's pressure relief valve and too much pressure has exploded the filter. You can try a new filter first but chances are the same thing will happen. Even cheap filters are made with enough integrity that this only happens when there's an engine problem, not from being cheap.

If you still haven't identified the cause of the leak, tow the car to a mechanic because at this point it is likely to be beyond the scope of most do-it-yourselfers. The filter "adapter" was mentioned and is a possibility. It's really a "fixture" to allow the filter to be attached to the engine. It's rare for them to crack, but it's not unheard of. There could also be a leaking plug at the end of an oil passage. They cap off access holes the manufacturer used to drill passages inside the engine. Usually those are threaded and have sealant on the threads, but in some applications they are pressed-in soft metal plugs. Plugs are typically used where something else will be bolted on over it so it can't work its way out. One of those plugs could have rusted out.

Look for the highest point you see oil running down the side of the engine. Oil doesn't run up so if you see it up high, there could be a valve cover gasket leaking or a camshaft seal, but both of those will leak relatively small amounts of oil and there won't be very much leaking after the engine is stopped. That doesn't match with the 10 minutes you originally stated to lose all the oil. Unless a valve cover has a chunk missing or a camshaft seal has blown out, the oil will take over a hundred miles to leak out. The clue is to figure out the highest point you see oil running down and follow that to the source.
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Caradiodoc
May 24, 2012.
Ok

Tiny
Rob 817
May 24, 2012.

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