Mechanics

CAR JUST DIED!

1991 Mercury Tracer • 4 cylinder Automatic • 125,000 miles

91 Mercury Tracer, last tune up was at least 3 years ago, just died at a stop light today, made a whining noise as I came to a stop, "check engine" lights came on, and it just died. I tried to turn it over but it wouldnt "catch". It doesnt make that "click click" noise that you get from a bad battery, and I just replaced the battery and alternator last Fall. It's got battery power, but it's just not turning over. What would cause it to just die like that? It's trying to start, it just feels like it's not firing on all four.
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Garvinn
May 9, 2011.




WAIT!

Do not disconnect the Battery!

Take it to a popular auto parts store--or other, and have it "CODED" for FREE!

I have, in the past, been able to get an "Off Duty" employee to do this for me, If I were not close to the store. Their delivery guy might be one, to try also.

That is the 1st step to diagnosing your problem!

Sometimes the store will diagnose you, or bring the codes back here, someone can probably assist you!

The Medic


CJ MEDEVAC
May 9, 2011.
I dont think it is the battery, I just bought it last Fall, as well as a new(rebuilt) alternator. How am I going to take the battery to a parts store if I dont disconnect it? I dont think it's a matter of just jumpstarting the car. Sorry if I sound so dumb but I dont know much about cars.
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Tiny
Garvinn
May 9, 2011.
Disconnect Battery---Erase Codes---Car No Run No more (Now)---Car cannot RE-GENERATE the Codes---YOU ARE NOW GUESSING, AS TO WHAT IS WRONG, MR. COMPUTER CANNOT TELL YOU WHAT'S WRONG AT THIS POINT!

Code that puppy!

The Medic


CJ MEDEVAC
May 9, 2011.
This car is OBD1 and the parts stores likely won't be able to read anything.

All "crank, no start" conditions are approached in the same way. Every engine requires certain functions to be able to run. Some of these functions rely on specific components to work and some components are part of more than one function so it is important to see the whole picture to be able to conclude anything about what may have failed. Also, these functions can ONLY be tested during the failure. Any other time and they will simply test good because the problem isn't present at the moment.
If you approach this in any other way, you are merely guessing and that only serves to replace unnecessary parts and wastes money.

Every engine requires spark, fuel and compression to run. That's what we have to look for.

These are the basics that need to be tested and will give us the info required to isolate a cause.

1) Test for spark at the plug end of the wire using a spark tester. If none found, check for power supply on the + terminal of the coil with the key on.

2) Test for injector pulse using a small bulb called a noid light. If none found, check for power supply at one side of the injector with the key on.

3) Use a fuel pressure gauge to test for correct fuel pressure, also noticing if the pressure holds when key is shut off.

4) If all of these things check good, then you would need to do a complete compression test.

Once you have determined which of these functions has dropped out,
you will know which system is having the problem.


Wrenchtech
May 9, 2011.
Yo, Medic! Do you honestly answer every question on here? I have a new question you haven't discovered yet. Just thought I'd help ya out there. LOL


Tiny
Dandemerrel
Jul 27, 2011.

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