Mechanics

WHY WONT MY CAR START?

1995 Lincoln Town Car

Engine Mechanical problem
1995 Lincoln Town Car V8 Two Wheel Drive Automatic 134, 00 miles

It turns over but gets no spark? What is wrong?
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Rinarain
December 23, 2008.




Post subject: 1995 Lincoln Town Car Why wont my car start?

If Your Engine Cranks but Does Not Start Follow this Troubleshooting Guide

Vehicles operate by the same principle; basic troubleshooting procedure applies to most cars.

Step 1 - Anytime you have a problem with electronically controlled components such as an engine, transmission, ABS brake, or SRS (supplemental restraint system, Air Bag) inspect all fuses using a test light and check the under hood power distribution center and under dash fuse panels. If all fuses test ok continue to the next step.

Step 2 - To check for problems with electronically controlled components such as an engine, transmission, ABS brake, or SRS (supplemental restraint system, Air Bag) and the fuses test ok a trouble code scan is needed to identify any system trouble. Use a simple scanner tool to retrieve trouble codes and see if they relate to the specific problem, like a crank angle sensor failure code. If the trouble code present does not pertain to the immediate problem like an EVAP code ignore it until a later time, after the car is running. The reason we repair non-related codes after the engine is running is because sometime false codes can be triggered by the engine not running. Once the engine is running again the code present might cycle and turn itself off. You might say " if the engine doesn't run shouldn't it have a trouble code?&Quot; Sometimes conditions occur that will not be detected by the computer, example: if the fuel pump fails the computer cannot detect the failure, so the engine doesn't start and the computer thinks everything is ok with no codes. If no trouble codes are present proceed to the next step.

Step 3 - Determine if the engine has compression, this can be done a number of ways but the most complete method is to perform a compression check. Remove the spark plugs and perform a compression test on one cylinder. If one cylinder has compression then the remaining cylinders usually will be close to the same. Crank the engine over about 5 seconds, normal compression readings should be between 125 psi and 160 psi on each cylinder. If no or little compression exists additional tests will be needed. The most popular reason for an engine to lose compression is a timing belt or timing chain fails. If low or no compression exists remove the oil fill cap and observe camshaft rotation when the engine is cranked over. If no rotation exists the timing belt or chain has failed. If your engine has a timing belt and you cannot see the camshaft easily remove the upper bolts to the timing cover and gain visual access to the belt, recheck cam rotation by cranking the engine over. Sometimes a timing belt or chain can jump causing the camshaft to lose correlation with the crankshaft and therefore causing low compression. The best test for this condition is to remove the timing belt/chain cover and inspect timing marks. If the compression is ok proceed to next step.

Step 4 - Test the ignition system output, ignition systems can vary in configuration but operate on the same principal. Ignition systems can consist of a coil, pick up coil, crank angle sensor, cam angle sensor, spark plugs, spark plug wires, distributor cap, ignition rotor and a distributor and any variations of these components. An ignition coil is a voltage stepper coil that transforms a low voltage (12 volts) signal into tens of thousands of volts needed to jump the gap of the spark plug. This coil is activated by an ignition module triggered by using the camshaft/crankshaft angle sensor; timing is adjusted by the ECM (computer).

Typical Ignition System in Operation

This primary electrical signal is generated by the ECM which calculates spark timing by using a variety of sensors including coolant temperature, mass air flow, and oxygen sensors. To perform a basic ignition output test you must have a test light and follow this ignition system output test video.

Basic Ignition System Output Test

Distributor less Ignition System Configuration
Some ignition systems have a coil for each spark plug. This is called Direct Ignition (DI) system; there are no plug wires in this system just individually controlled ignition coils. The amount of coils or spark plugs depend on the number of cylinders the engine is designed with, example: four cylinders, six cylinders etc. To perform a basic ignition output test you must have a test light follow this ignition system output test video and substitute the ignition coil for the plug wire (Note: leave the coil trigger wires connected).

Coil Over Spark Plug

If the ignition system test is weak or non-existent test the car fuses, both under hood power distribution center and the fuse panel under dash. This test is performed with a test light tool. The test light should illuminate on both sides of the fuse, if not the fuse has failed and needs to be replaced. If the fuses are ok a manufacturer specific repair procedure is required and an online auto repair manual is needed to continue. If the ignition system tests ok proceed to the next step.

Step 5 - Test fuel system pressure, test for proper fuel pressure with a test gauge on the fuel rail or in line somewhere in the system, most throttle body injection cars (TBI) are between 13 psi and 17 psi. Most (DPI) direct port inject systems are between 40 psi and 55 psi. If good fuel pressure is present continue to next step. If no or little fuel pressure is present check the fuel pump fuse and fuel pump control relay located in the fuse panel, you can find this fuse and relay by checking your owner's manual, back of the fuse panel cover diagram, or an online auto repair manual, if the fuse or relay has failed replace it a new unit and re-test.

Note: some Ford cars have an inertia switch designed to cut off the fuel pump in the event of an accident. Sometimes this switch can accidentally be triggered causing the engine to not start. If the car is exposed to a random bump either in the road or by another car this switch can be triggered. To check for this condition locate the inertia switch, if the cut off switch has been active it will have a white or red indicator at the top of the switch. Push this indicator down to disarm the cut off switch, if the indicator does not move down it is not activated and is not the problem.

Have a helper crank over the engine while you place your fingers over the relay, does the relay click under your fingers? If so the relay could be working, there is a chance the relay has burned contacts inside causing the problem but we will get back to that. Next, access the fuel pump power feed wire, there are a few ways to do this, first you need a wiring schematic to find the color wire needed for testing, the best way to do this is with an online auto repair manual. Once you have found the color wire it should be located in the wiring harness near the fuel tank were the pump is located. Ground the test light and probe (pierce the wire's outer coating with the test light point) the wire, have a helper crank the engine over. If the test light illuminates and you have no fuel pressure the fuel pump had failed and needs to be replaced. If the test light doesn't illuminate the fuel pump control relay has probably failed, replace it with a new unit and re-test, in most cases this relay is under thirty dollars. There is an outside chance the power feed to the relay has failed but it doesn't happen very often. If this is the case use an online auto repair manual to trace the power source to the relay.

Rasmataz
Dec 23, 2008.


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