Mechanics

ENGINE OVERHEATING

1993 Chrysler Grand Voyager

Engine Cooling problem
1993 Chrysler Grand Voyager 4 cyl Front Wheel Drive Manual 160000 miles

i have a 2.5 TD Voyager and some problem with overheating. I was on a longer trip and it started overheating. It was a very hot two days, 92 F. I was driving in a line of cars not much space between the cars and at a slow pass. Then I noticed that the temperature got high up, close to the point when the fan should start and it was at that point for longer time. It didnt move up or down from it. The line of cars cleared of and I started driving faster and was expecting the temperature to get down but nothing. Then when I went up the hill it started going over the mark when the fan starts working. I stopped checked if the fan is working and it was working. I waited there for some twenty minutes to cool it off while the engine on. The fan was able to cool it off but not till the mark like it was before. It stopped working just few milimeters before that mark. The rest of the way the car would coo to that mark only if I would be driving longer periods down the hill and would also, to my notice heat up much faster then usuall. Also while driving it on a highway at speed of 80 mph at night when it was cooler the gauge would show the temperature a bit above normal and even if I was to slow down it didnt cool off to the normal line.
Last year I changed the water pump, few months back I changed the coolant and I got stuck on the road cause one of the water hoses was leaking (they said the mechanic put a too strong of a coolant). That was changed and new coolant put in but few weeks after that I noticed I am loosing the coolant and could see any obvious spots where. I went to the mechanic he said it could be a broken head gasket. I consulted few other mechanics which said it might not be a problem. Country is very unstable here and it is hard to trust people, especially mechanics, plus there is no official Chrysler garage. I continued driving and drove with no problems next 4500 miles until this happened and was driving long distance on hotter days that described here. What could it be? Could it be a head gasket or something else. If it is a head gasket how can you check that? Would the can loos on power then cause mine isnt.
TX.
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Croatianterry
August 2, 2009.



A coolant system pressurizes the hotter it gets raising the boiling point. If the system will not hold the pressure the water will boil off. Start by using a coolant pressure tester test the coolant system and verify it and the cap hold the pressure look on the cap to know how much pressure to use. Look for a leak while it is under pressure.

Tiny
Wineburger
Aug 17, 2009.
Correct about the pressure raising the boiling point, but not the temperature.

Next time it acts up, run the heater on high / hot. If it cools very quickly, suspect rotted and missing fins between the tubes of the radiator. When this happened to my '88 Grand Caravan, it would run warm at anything over 60 mph and 65 degrees. A year later, it ran warmer traveling across Nebraska at night, 35 degrees and 80 mph. Running the rear heater on low was enough to keep it cool until I replaced the radiator.

Also check for a butterfly collection blocking the cooling fins in the AC condenser or radiator. A leaking head gasket could cause air bubbles to enter the cooling system and make it look like coolant in the overflow reservoir is boiling, but the actual temperature of the coolant won't go up very much.

Gauges are not real accurate by the way. There can be a 15 degree change even though the gauge doesn't move, so don't be overly concerned with the exact position of the pointer.

Caradiodoc

Caradiodoc
Aug 20, 2009.
So now somebodys trying to tell me a car will not overheat because of a coolant leak, and yes there is a test for a head gasket. Its called a block tester.

Tiny
Wineburger
Aug 21, 2009.