Mechanics

RACK & PINION BUSHINGS

2002 Toyota Sequoia • 2WD Automatic • 124,000 miles

'02 toyota sequioa 2 wheel drive v8 engine 124,000miles

I have been told the rack and pinion bushings need to be replaced. I'm trying to get a price and there seems to be some confusion on how many bushings exist in this car. Can you clarify for me?

Thanks
mfandml
Avatar
Mfandml
March 18, 2011.




There are bushings that are directly connected to the steering rack. Then there are bushings that are connected to suspension parts that affect the stability and general handling of the Truck.
Opinions will vary because if you replace just the bushings that are connected to the steering rack, they will tend to wear out the other suspension bushings.
There are entire kits available, kits made of polyurethane that will make the ride stiffer, but not as comfortable.
The main thing to keep in mind is that your instinct about the repair shop you are working with is good.
You can always find reputable repair shops through links on this site in your area.
The best things to look for are shops that keep a clean shop and a professional attitude towards their work, i.E, wearing uniforms instead of olkd t-shirts or piled up old parts in the corners of the shop. Rarely, you can find a shop that pays their mechanics salary instead of or in addition to a flat rate for work done.

I hope this information helps.

Thanks for your reply. I looked on your home page and also tried the search box, I cannot find any mechanic listings. Can you tell me where to look specifically on the website to find a good mechanic in my area.

Thanks
mfandml

Tiny
Mfandml
Mar 18, 2011.
Try going to the community page. Click on the 2CarPros banner on the top of pretty much any page. To the top right you will see text ads with small blue arrows on the bottom left of those ads. You can use these to go through the different repair shops until you find a suitable one.
Unfortunately, the links are not always as local to your area as they used to be. However, if you click on the ads, they have store locators to help you out.

Let me know if that helps. If not, I will search around some if you let me know the general area where you live.

Two things the banners at the top were not very helpful. I live in zip code 33884, if you could make some recommendations that would be helpful.

Secondly relating to my original question. I called three mechanics that did not have the opportunity to look at my car. I was told by one there are 3 bushings, another said there are 2 and a third said there is one. Having not seen the car they were obviously not telling me how many were bad, they were simply telling me how many existed. I understand your answer if they were actually looking at the car. However in the scenario I describe I'm still not sure why they all came up with a different number. Can you explain this?

Tiny
Mfandml
Mar 20, 2011.
The labor will most likely be the same for both and the parts should only be slightly higher to replace all three.
Get estimates from the shops that want to replace one and the other shop that wanted to do all three. The labor hours should be about the same and the parts,(of course), will be a little higher to replace three.

Here is a link to a site called (AUTOMD;
http://www.automd.com/shops/FL/winter-haven/

It is a good site for finding repair shop, costs and other automotive related items. It has some limitations as I could not give you an estimate for the bushings. There were not listed in there repair section. It has been around for a while and is reputable. I think any repair shop that has links in the site are a good choice as they weed out the bad ones.

A few tips to look for when picking a repair shop;

A clean and professional look. e.g., Are the techs wearing old t-shirts or uniforms? Do you see old parts piled up in a corner? etc.
One last thing is how the techs s get paid, it is either salary, flat rate or a combination of both. Flat rate is a set amount of time that will be paid for a job and if it takes the tech longer to do the repair than the flat rate they are going to get, the tech looses money. So, they generally rush through jobs to make up for repairs where they lose time.
Salary paid techs are hard to find, but are a much better bet. They will be able to take their time on each repair and don't have to, "Beat the Clock" so to speak.

I hope this information helps. Let me know how it goes.
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