Mechanics

HEARER SUPPLY LINE

1999 Chrysler Town and Country • 6 cylinder 2WD Automatic • 198,000 miles

How do you removed heater supply & return tublingline for rear hear, 3.8 l engine, 1999 chrysler town & country. We have the tubling loose, it runs along the backside of the firewall, down under the passenger floorboard. We can wiggle it, however, there is not enough space to work it out.
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Jb5148m
May 10, 2011.




Don't waste your time removing them. Once you have the quick disconnects taken apart, run bulk heater hose from end to end and use the old hoses as something convenient to tie strap the new hoses to.

Those quick connect fittings have an o-ring that shrinks in cold weather and leaks. There was a service bulletin about replacing them with the new superceded part that had two o-rings on each end, ... That shrink and leak. We were required to use these when the van was under warranty, but the permanent fix was to use bulk hose.

Bleeding the air pocket out of the rear heater core on its own can take days or weeks. To speed that up, the system must have pressure from warming the engine or by using a cooling system pressure tester, pinch one of the hoses, then loosen the clamp for that hose at the rear. The pressure will force coolant into the heater core and the air will escape by the loose clamp.
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Caradiodoc
May 10, 2011.
Hello jb5148m-- Two days ago I had the same question that you did, and I saw your post while searching on the Internet. I couldn't find any advice so I tacked it myself. My rear heater pipes had rusted through on the bottom and I lost my coolant. I bought a new aftermarket pipe and hose assembly for about $100, but getting the old one out with all of its pipes, welds, brackets, and bends proved to be complicated. To allow working room I had to remove the air intake plenum, the throttle body and all of its hoses and connections, the battery, and disconnect the exhaust pipe from the rear manifold and slide it over out of the way. The intake plenum has a bracket on the bottom rear that holds some tie-downs for wiring. You have to remove two bolts with a 15mm wrench working underneath, up through the access tunnel where the exhaust pipe passes through to remove this bracket. You also have to remove a plate that braces the alternator to the plenum. Once all of that "stuff" is loose / removed, you can twist and turn and pull and sweat to get that crooked pipe assembly out and the new one back in. It was difficult, but now it is fixed and it looks "factory". This is still a great van with 180,000 miles on it. If I could buy a new one just like it, I would. Hope this helps.

Tiny
Megawat54
Jun 16, 2011.
Wow; you should have run the van backwards on the assembly line! I assume you're referring to the front pipes coming down from the engine. It's the aluminum pipes under the floor that used to cause all the trouble with leaking 0-rings.

Thanks for the input.

Caradiodoc
Jun 17, 2011.
Hello caradiodoc-- when you mentioned "o-rings" and "quick disconnects" I thought you might be talking about a newer model van. My 1999 model has standard 5/8" heater hoses with hose clamps that join the steel pipes (which I replaced) to the aluminum pipes under the car. The small 9" sections of heater hose are located below the passenger seat floor.

. And I forgot to mention something else I disconnected when removing the intake air plenum. I had to un-bolt the coil pack and lay it aside.

Tiny
Megawat54
Jun 17, 2011.
If I understand correctly, you have hose clamps at the rear? If so, someone replaced the quick-connects already. If you cut the crimp off the pipes and slide the original rubber hoses off, that will expose barbs on the pipes that will hold the new hoses from sliding off once they're clamped.

Can't remember if there were quick-connects up front behind the cross member. Might not have been because those pipes never leaked there, only by the right rear tire. They started using those parts with the redesigned '96 models.

Caradiodoc
Jun 17, 2011.
From:jb5148m, I spent 4 days removing the tubling lines, was doing the job for my son-in law, he had another car, therefore, there was no hurry. Below is how I did the job, it came out OK, Van been running good for over six weeks.
Mechanic at the Chrysler Dealership said they removed the winshield wiper arms, complete linklege, motor assemby,
it all comes out as a complete unit, remove about 6 bolts, 4 nuts, one plug, one hose, easy removable. Gives you a lot more room, still could not get the heater supply and return tubling line out, (steel line not a hose), used a sawall, cut the steel tubling line. I'm in the process of replacing chrysler part number 4677557AA, heater supply and return tubling line for rear heater on 3.8 litre engine. Chrysler cost: $366.00, I shopped the web, found an aftermarket, from http://www.rockauto.com, dorman, p/n: 626300, price $70.79. The different is Chrysler upgraded their part from steel to aluminum tubling. The aftermarker is as original made of steel. Therefore, it does not bend, this is why you can not easily remove or replaced the part. With the complete wiper assembly removed, I still could not fit the part in, I, removed the intake manifold. Again, it was not difficult, 2 bolts, 2 nuts, 2 nuts on back side of intake, disconnect EGR pipe, some plugs, and hoses. More time comsuming than work.
Will need to purchase a new intake manifold gasket, and EGR gasket. They will likely try to sell you an intake manifold gasket kit for $19.99, you only need one gasket out of this kit. I had to go to three auto part stores. At Advance Auto, purchase Fel-Pro MS 94566, 48163, intake manifold upper set Chrysler V-6 3.8L, this set include the EGR gasket, set cost $2.99. Once, I got the intake manifold off, the rear heater supply & return tubling line went in smoothly. I'm sending you this info, so as, you can pass it along to anyone else who has this problem.


Tiny
Jb5148m
Jul 11, 2011.

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