Mechanics

DODGE NEON FUSE PROBLEM

1997 Dodge Neon

I have a 97 dodge neon that a friend gave to my husband and I. She bought a new car because the fuel pump fuse continues to blow every time she starts it up. I don't have the money to get a diagnostic for it so I'm trying to fix it myself. Please help!
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WillowMcDorman
March 22, 2013.



A simple trick to finding a short is to replace the blown fuse with a pair of spade terminals, then use small jumper wires to connect them to a 12 volt light bulb. A brake light bulb works well. When the circuit is live and the short is present, the bulb will be full brightness and hot so be sure it's not laying on the carpet or against a plastic door panel. Now you can unplug electrical connectors and move things around to see what makes the short go away. When it does, the bulb will get dim or go out.


Caradiodoc
Mar 22, 2013.
Every time we turn the key in the ignition, the fuel pump fuse blows. I just need to know the name of the part so I can buy it and do it myself.


Tiny
WillowMcDorman
Mar 22, 2013.
You take it to a mechanic who will diagnose it. He will figure out the cause of the problem, then tell you the name of whatever part is needed. There's no way I can know that if you aren't going to test anything. Mechanics don't have it that easy. If the fuse is labeled "fuel pump" logic dictates the fuel pump is shorted and that's the name of the part you want. Experience, however, shows that pumps rarely short so chances are you waste your money on a new pump because I told you the name of the part, then you're angry with me when the fuse still blows.

If you do my light bulb trick, as many intelligent mechanics would do, you can simply unplug the pump, then see if the bulb went out. If it did not, you know the short is still there and it's not the pump. Your choice if you want to spend money on something that very likely isn't needed.

There's actually two different fuses involved with the fuel pump circuit. The second one also feeds the ignition coil pack, injectors, alternator field, and oxygen sensor heaters. None of those things typical short either, and none of them are listed on that fuse. Most commonly a wire going to one of those things is grounded. You can spend all day tearing wire harnesses apart looking for that. Mechanics don't want to waste time that they have to charge you for, so they use my light bulb, then they just push and wiggle the wires to see what affects it. 95 percent of the time there is no part that needs to be replaced when a fuse blows. Most shorts are related to bare wires that are repaired.


Caradiodoc
Mar 22, 2013.
Does this look like it could be the problem? My husband said there is what looks like a wire harness that looks exposed on one end. Does that help?


Tiny
WillowMcDorman
Mar 27, 2013.
That appears to be the pressure switch on the back of the AC compressor. That is in a different circuit than the fuel pump.


Caradiodoc
Mar 27, 2013.