Rear Brake Adjustment, E brake and regular brake

Tiny
TREBOR1
  • MEMBER
  • 1990 CHEVROLET SILVERADO
  • V8
  • 4WD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 168,000 MILES
I read a post with same problem but answer didn't help, very short and not detailed. I replaced shoes and drums and had to adjust star wheel all the way in to get drum over shoes. I though star wheels self adjusted when backed up each time you hit brakes, true or false. As a side note I never have understood how a star wheel moves since it's anchored at each end. Anyway I also thought you could move star wheel manually thru drum but no way on these drums no access. Pedal movement not bad, what is spec on how far it should depress before braking? Mine probably an inch and a half. But e brake goes to floor, with no braking. So to recap main issue, how to adjust star wheel manually once drums on and will they auto adjust in reverse? One more note/question, if one side E brake is disconnected will other side still engage? I ask because a friend has a year older Silverado and he accidentally took e brake cable off and well one more question, how do you get it back on with the spring? I tried to help him. Very difficult to compress spring and slide back on plate. Thinking maybe napa sold some sort of small spring compressor but they had no idea. I realize that maybe too much to answer sorry for multiple questions.
Thanks if you can help
Bob
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Tuesday, August 26th, 2014 AT 6:33 AM

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Tiny
HMAC300
  • EXPERT
Rear braeks shold adjust by them selves after initial installation and adjustment. The star wheel has to go down to properly adjust it as well as all items on shoes installed correctly. A lot of times the parking brake strut or one of the other parts isnt' put in correctly and you end up with no parking brake. To get eh spring on the cable back I use a pair of dykes to pull it back an dhold it while putting cable back to adjuster leg. It' s not easy. On a Chevrolet or GM product because they use an equalizer the one parking brake will not work as they are pulled at the same time. The tool that was sold to you is for the pakring brake adjustment at the equalizer not to compress springs. But autoparts guys don't know what they are doing anyhow when it comes to actually working on a car as most have never done it. Brake shoes shold be adjusted to.010-.020 from drums with a gauge most mechanics go by feel so that parking brakes will work an d as far as pedal travel fluid in master due to disc brakes will determine how far your pedal goes. Or pad wear as well. See pics
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Tuesday, August 26th, 2014 AT 6:52 AM
Tiny
TREBOR1
  • MEMBER
Thanks. Actually just realized I never lubed starwheel. Lithemn grease best just like caliper bolts? And how do you get a gauge inside a drum for measurement? Move Starwheel down to move shoes out is that correct? And pretty sure these new drums had no knockout spot to knockout to get to starwheel, is that possible? Will try the dykes. Now if I read correctly, pedal movement is only affected by front brakes? So by pedal movement alone my rear shoes may not even be engaging at all? I always thought if rear not engaging pedal would continue to the floor? Where is the equalizer for E brake and what kind of adjusting does it need? Thanks again. Great site. Will defiantly donate to the cause with my next issue, and being I drive a 1990 year, Silverado there will be more issues!
Bob
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Tuesday, August 26th, 2014 AT 7:34 AM
Tiny
HMAC300
  • EXPERT
The gauge is a specialized one that measure out side diameter of drum an dbrake at same time just adjust them to get a slight drag on them. The parkingbrake adjust was sent in last reply in pic. There are no pics just look about in middle of truck along parking brake cable you'll see it. The front brakes are par tof pedal movement but most braking is done by discs so if fluid is low it can effect pedal height as well as improperly adjusted rear brakes.
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Tuesday, August 26th, 2014 AT 8:03 AM

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