2005 Mitsubishi Galant timing belt

Tiny
GTICKER
  • MEMBER
  • 2005 MITSUBISHI GALANT
  • 4 CYL
  • FWD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 92,000 MILES
I was told that timing belt should be changed after 60,000 miles but Honda and Toyota recommend change at much higher mileage. I noticed that my maintainance manual is not updated, I mean it says about distributor cup and wires for example, while there is none on the particular model, so I wander is recommended mileage for change of timing belt for 2005 model the same 60,000 miles as for old models, or it is different.
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Tuesday, September 8th, 2009 AT 7:43 AM

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Tiny
JACK42
  • MEMBER
They have quite an odd-ball schedule for that.
Your 2005 is suggested at 60k unless you live in Maine, California, Vermont or Massachusetts, then it is 105k. Dont ask me how or why that is, seems pretty strange to me, but that is what Mitsu says to do
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Tuesday, September 8th, 2009 AT 7:58 AM
Tiny
CHRIS BLACKWOOD
  • MEMBER
Mitsubishi is notorious for timing belt issues probably as the other guy said the recommendation for vehicle maintenance for the timing belt his computer I would err on the side of caution and do the 60,000 because you do not want bent valves caved in Pistons or scarring on your walls
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Sunday, December 22nd, 2019 AT 2:40 PM
Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
When you have an engine-related question, please list the engine size so we look up the right parts and diagrams. In this case there is just one four-cylinder engine for this model. One source makes reference to this being an interference engine, so the concern about bent valves is valid, and expensive. I too would err on the side of caution. As far back as the late 1980s, Honda, for example, listed their timing belt replacement interval recommendation at 75,000 miles, and they commonly broke at 60,000 miles.

Be sure to write down the mileage at which this service was done so you'll know when it's needed again. If you do it now at 92,000 miles, then forget, you might have it done again at 120,000 miles, which would be too soon and a waste of money.

This job is listed as taking 2.6 hours, which is not bad, plus up to an additional 0.8 hours for up to six additional parts. Plan on most of those additional parts such as tensioner devices and idler pulleys. To insure the quality of the repair, no conscientious mechanic is going to risk his reputation or your satisfaction by not replacing the other parts involved with a timing belt. Repeat failures are often caused by those items that didn't get replaced.
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Sunday, December 22nd, 2019 AT 7:01 PM

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