Have to crank a lot to start car

Tiny
MICHELLE ANN
  • MEMBER
  • 2006 FORD TAURUS
  • 3.0L
  • 6 CYL
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 168,000 MILES
Every time I start my car, it has to be turned over and continues cranking before starting. I just replaced the spark plugs, and put a starter on it about two months ago. And I am getting my cat cleaned out because I is clogged and getting new flex joint because I is leaking. Can you tell me what all it can be? Thank you
Do you
have the same problem?
Yes
No
Thursday, February 2nd, 2017 AT 10:33 AM

1 Reply

Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
You do not "clean" a catalytic converter. If the catalyst has melted, the cause must be corrected first so the same thing does not happen to the new one. Any mechanic who would hollow out a converter will be fired from his job, and with good reason. On '1996 and newer cars, the efficiency of the catalytic converters is monitored by the Engine Computer. When one stops doing its job, a diagnostic fault code is set, and the Check Engine light is turned on.

There are well over 2,000 potential diagnostic fault codes that can be set, and they all mean very different things. About half of them turn on the Check Engine light. If one of your catalytic converters is not working, the Check Engine light will be on all the time. If a new problem develops, how will you ever know since the light is already on? Many of those problems are extremely simple and inexpensive to repair, but if they are ignored because you are not aware of them, they can turn into very expensive repairs. One of the more common unexpected outcomes is a plugged catalytic converter caused by too much unburned fuel burning in the converter instead of in the engine.

A long crank time is usually caused by fuel pressure bleeding down when the engine is off. A leaking injector is the most common cause, but a leaking fuel pressure regulator or fuel pump can do that too. If an injector is leaking badly enough, raw fuel can wash down the sides of the cylinder wall and wash off the protective film of oil. That, and the fuel that condenses in the oil to form sludge, will greatly shorten the life of the engine. This is where no mechanic who has your best interest at heart would do anything to disable a catalytic converter.
Was this
answer
helpful?
Yes
No
Thursday, February 2nd, 2017 AT 12:25 PM

Please login or register to post a reply.

Recommended Guides