1997 Ford Taurus clueless

Tiny
DIPY03
  • MEMBER
  • 1997 FORD TAURUS
Transmission problem
1997 Ford Taurus 6 cyl Two Wheel Drive Automatic

I have a output shaft speed sensor or vss and I need to know were it goes in the vegival I have a chilton but im not sure about it dont know the location it goes
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Saturday, July 26th, 2008 AT 6:15 PM

4 Replies

Tiny
OBXAUTOMEDIC
  • EXPERT
The Turbine Shaft Speed Sensor is located on the left rear lower side of engine compartment, on raer side of transaxle.

The Vehicle Speed Sensor is located on the rear center of engine compartment, mounted on transaxle.
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Saturday, July 26th, 2008 AT 8:58 PM
Tiny
BGBEVAN
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1997 Taurus, 200K mi. I had the classic problem indicating a speed sensor failure. Speedo didn't work and transmission shifted hard or stuck in low gear when heated up. There are two sensors on the transmission, the Vehicle Speed Sensor(VSS) located on the output shaft of the transaxle on the passenger side, and the Turbine Shaft Sensor(TSS) located under the exhaust manifold on the input shaft, accessible from the driver's side. I thought the VSS was bad but couldn't find it and ended up changing the TSS. This fixed my problem so my question is, which one of these sensors drives the speedometer? Both, VSS, or TSS? Most posts on this issue say to change the VSS when this problem occurs and make a vague reference to the TSS.
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Saturday, July 30th, 2011 AT 7:02 AM
Tiny
OBXAUTOMEDIC
  • EXPERT
Ok, hope this helps. The VSS ontrols the Speedometer.

Vehicle speed sensor (VSS) - This may also be known as an output speed sensor (OSS). This sensor sends a varying frequency signal to the TCU to determine the current speed of the vehicle. The TCU uses this information to determine when a gear change should take place based in the various operating parameters.

Turbine speed sensor (TSS) - This may also be known as an input speed sensor (ISS). This sensor sends a varying frequency signal to the TCU to determine the current rotational speed of the input shaft or torque converter. The TCU uses the input shaft speed to determine slippage across the torque converter and potentially to determine the rate of slippage across the bands and clutches. This information is vital to regulate the application of the torque converter lock-up clutch smoothly and effectively.
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Sunday, July 31st, 2011 AT 1:15 AM
Tiny
BGBEVAN
  • MEMBER
Thanks obxautomedic for the quick and thorough response. This is the BEST response I have seen on this subject and really clears it up for me. I was able to get at the VSS from the drivers side of the engine with a long reach, a 10 mm socket, and a short extension. I had read numerous blogs and forums that talked about dropping exhaust pipes, jacking up the engine, taking off the tires, etc. Also, repair estimates of $200 to $750. I didn't need to disconnect anything to complete the repair. It is a little tricky because you essentially have to do it with one hand and "blind". It would take about 1/2 hour if I had to do it again and it's only the price for a new VSS module. About $16 @ NAPA. Probably $75 for a Ford OEM. I have the procedure and a few pics if anyone is interested. Think this works for a 1998-1998 Taurus. Bgbevan@earthlink. Net
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Sunday, July 31st, 2011 AT 12:48 PM

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