1993 Ford Taurus Wagon won't accelerate from idle!

Tiny
BRETTSZ
  • MEMBER
  • 1993 FORD TAURUS
  • 6 CYL
  • FWD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 160,000 MILES
My wagon has trouble accelerating from idle after highway driving. After stopping at a red light, the car idles smoothly, but when I press the accelerator, nothing happens for 3-7 seconds except some sputtering. After that, the car accelerates smoothly and has no trouble until I stop again. The service light is lit, but the codes say it is an AC compressor. The AC has not worked in years. The car does it when it is cold, but it is much more noticeable after highway driving. I have replaced the plugs, wires, distributor cap, and rotor in an effort to solve the problem, with no effect. To top it off, my mpgs have tanked to about 17 hwy. I am struggling here guys. Any ideas?
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Thursday, March 26th, 2009 AT 2:52 PM

2 Replies

Tiny
RASMATAZ
  • MEMBER
Check the fuel pressure/mass airflow and throttle position sensors to include the EGR valve.
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Thursday, March 26th, 2009 AT 3:35 PM
Tiny
JGAROFALO
  • MEMBER
The big suspects are the TPS (throttle position sensor) and the MAF (mass air flow sensor). Also, you could have an air leak in the intake path.

It is possible that the code that was received was misinterpreted to be a problem with the A/C. Having said that, continue to the real diagnostics.

The TP sensor will set a code if it malfunctions - but not every time. If the sensor sends the PCM a "dirty" signal, it can cause hesitations. This is a good place to at least check. Check for dirty connections or corrosion on the connections.

Then there is the Mass Air Flow sensor and associated ductwork. The purpose of the mass air flow sensor is to tell the PCM how much air is entering the engine at any given time. The PCM then admits the proper amount of fuel to combine with that air to achieve the proper mixture. Any leaks of unmetered air into the engine will disturb that "perfect" mixture. Check for any kind of vacuum leaks. Examine the PCV and brake booster lines in particular. Examine the duct that goes from the MAF to the intake of the engine. Air leaks in that area are cause for major driveability problems.

Also, be warned that if the MAF goes out of calibration, in MANY cases, it will NOT set a code. If the signal it sends to the PCM is within a reasonable range - even if it is incorrect - the PCM will be satisfied, and will not set a code.

Hope this will be of some help to you. Good luck!
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Thursday, March 26th, 2009 AT 4:02 PM

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