1993 Ford Taurus Fuel Pump

Tiny
JHCHALLIS
  • 1993 FORD TAURUS

I have a 1993 Ford Taurus, 3.0l V-6, 130,000 miles. I just replaced the radiator because it was cracked. Upon completion of replacing it, the car would not start. The engine will turn over, but it will not start. It has a new battery and alternator (less than 3 months). I realized that when trying to start it, I did not hear the fuel pump initiate when the key was turned to the on position. I replaced the fuel pump, but the new pump does not initiate either. I have the new pump connected, with the fuel filter off. When the key is moved to the on position, it does not pump any fule through the lines. I am hesitant to believe it was a bad fuel pump that I purchased new. I think it is something not telling my fuel pump to work, some type of relay or control module. Any ideas?

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Saturday, May 12th, 2007 AT 10:08 PM

16 Replies

Tiny
JHCHALLIS
  • MEMBER

Initially, that was my concern. I figured since I had to remove that to install the radiator, there must be some sequence that it needed to be done to reset it or something. The pins are fine, I have removed and replaced it three times. At least now I know where the fuel pump relay is because that one was of my questions, I could not locate it! Any more suggestions other than replacing it?

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Sunday, May 13th, 2007 AT 11:01 AM
Tiny
JHCHALLIS
  • MEMBER

I would like to test first, it is getting pricey to get this thing running again. Battery, alternator, radiator, fuel pump.

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Sunday, May 13th, 2007 AT 11:18 AM
Tiny
JHCHALLIS
  • MEMBER

Thank you for help. I read on another post somewhere that I should tap the box with a wrench or something and it may work. Lo and behold, I tapped it with a screwdriver and it started working. The car started right up! Hopefully it will continue to run fine. If not, then I at least knwo the root cause of the problem. Thanks again for your help! :D

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Sunday, May 13th, 2007 AT 9:08 PM
Tiny
JHCHALLIS
  • MEMBER

Me again. The car ran fine for about 3 days and now I cannot get it to run right. It will start, but runs really rough until it gets warm. Once the engine gets warm, it seems to run fine, except when you try to accelerate from a stop. I ran a code scanner on it because the check engine light came on and it came back with throttle positioning sensor errors, so I changed it to no avail. I ensured I put it in correctly. The code scanner also came back with an EGR Valve error, but I am not so sure the EGR valve will cause it to run like it is now. Any more suggestions? Should I go ahead and replace the CCRM or could you walk me through some test steps? Thanks again for your help.

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Wednesday, May 23rd, 2007 AT 9:13 PM
Tiny
RUDPRO
  • MEMBER

A bad EGR valve, if stuck open would make it idle rough. To check it, with the engine running, disconnect the vacuum hose from the EGR valve. Plug the hose and attach a hand operated vacuum pump to the valve. Apply 5-10 inches of vacuum. The engine should run rough or even stall. If it doesn't, or if it changes very little, replace the egr valve. Also inspect the vacuum hose for cracks or leaks before testing the valve.

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Wednesday, May 23rd, 2007 AT 9:59 PM
Tiny
JHCHALLIS
  • MEMBER

OK, I have checked the EGR Valve, it is not the problem. I am having a hard time getting it to start, it is acting like it is flooding. Once it starts, it backfires a little. If I allow it to idle (when it will) and press on the peddle, it wants to die. It will also backfire at that point like it is getting too much fuel or something. I have replaced the distributer cap and rotor button. Next up is plugs and wires I think. Any more suggestions?

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Saturday, May 26th, 2007 AT 12:04 AM
Tiny
RUDPRO
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You could check the fuel pressure regulator. It has 2 fuel lines going to it and a vacuum hose on top. Attach a fuel pressure gauge to the schrader valve. With the engine running, detach the vacuum hose from the regulator. The pressure should rise 8-12 psi. If not the regulator is bad. Also, if fuel is squirting out the regulator when you take the vacuum hose off, it's bad.

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Saturday, May 26th, 2007 AT 12:16 AM
Tiny
JHCHALLIS
  • MEMBER

OK, replaced the fuel pressure regulator to no avail. Starts somewhat better and runs when warm. Acts like it is flooding when I give it gas from a stop and also on the highway when trying to hit passing gear. Anything else come to mind?

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Saturday, May 26th, 2007 AT 10:24 PM
Tiny
RUDPRO
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Check the mass air flow sensor. Very gently tap it while engine is idling. If idle changes, sensor is bad. I'm not sure which type of sensor you have, but you might want to take it out and see if the resistors are dirty. You'll see 2 of them in the mouth of the sensor unit. If they look dirty, you can spray them with throttle cleaner. Be careful doing this, they are fragile. Do not touch them with anything, just spray them. If that doesn't help, I'd check the O2 sensors next.

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Saturday, May 26th, 2007 AT 11:42 PM
Tiny
JHCHALLIS
  • MEMBER

No change in the idling when tapping the mass air flow sensor. I guess the oxygen sensors are next. Is there any special way to check it without just replacing it? I think if the O2 sensor was bad, wouldn't it shown on my code scanner? I have all clear during key on-engine off and engine running tests. My check engine light is no longer on. Man, am I getting frustrated!

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Sunday, May 27th, 2007 AT 11:20 PM
Tiny
RUDPRO
  • MEMBER

Let's back up first to where you said you changed the cap and rotor and the plugs and wires are next. You should change them anyway if they are due. You could pull the plugs and check them, see if they're carboned up or fouled. You could buy a spark gap tester, they' re cheap, and check for spark at the end of each wire. Or, like I said, if they're due for a change anyway, change the plugs and wires. When is the last time they were changed? Let me know what you want to do, or we could test the ignition coil also, before changing the plugs and wires.

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Monday, May 28th, 2007 AT 2:23 AM
Tiny
TAURUSWHEEL
  • MEMBER

Not sure on yours, but I know on earlier Taurus models, when the tps was replaced, it had to be checked with a voltmeter to be sure it was initially installed correctly, certain readings with throttle shut and open, on yours try loosening the screws slightly while the car is idling, rotate the entire unit either way if possible, see if the idle smooths out. Good luck. If the sensor is way out of range, check light should be on, but it could be out of whack a touch and still be within pcm operating parameters and not set the light.

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Monday, May 28th, 2007 AT 11:11 AM
Tiny
RUDPRO
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I found another thing to check with the EGR system, the PFE, an electronic solenoid that gives feedback to the computer. It regulates idle and fuel air ratio in accordance with signals from the computer. It's also wired in with the TPS. It may explain the codes you got for the TPS and EGR system. I'm not sure if it's the same on the 3.0 engine but on the 3.8 it's a small gray box with a 3 wire plug and a tube going to the EGR valve. To check with a voltmeter, ground the negative lead from the voltmeter. Backprobe with a paper clip into the brown/lt. Green wire. If you can't get a paperclip in, you have to pierce the wire with the voltmeter probe. Turn the key on, engine off and the voltmeter should read 3.25 volts dc, + or -.25 volts. You could check it further by applying pressure with a clean radiator pressure tester and a hand operated vacuum pump. There are different voltage readings for different pressure and vacuum readings. Let me know if you want to proceed with it. Also if you pierce the wire, put a drop of super glue on it to seal it back up.

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Monday, May 28th, 2007 AT 6:21 PM
Tiny
JHCHALLIS
  • MEMBER

I went ahead and changed the plugs and wires, no help. The TPS cannot rotate with the screws loosened, they are on opposite sides of one another and no adjustment is allowed. I had to turn it a bit to go into place, then hold it while inserting the screws. I am relatively sure it is on correctly, but will mess with it a bit to see if anything changes.

I will check the PFE and get back to you guys. Also, how do I check the coil? I guess I assumed it was OK since the car will start. I really appreciate your help.

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Monday, May 28th, 2007 AT 10:49 PM
Tiny
RUDPRO
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This is the first step, I will follow up later with testing the wiring harness, coil primary voltage and coil supply voltage.

Follow the coil wire from the center terminal on the distributor cap to the end at the ignition coil. Make sure the transaxle is in Park (AT) or Neutral (MT) and that the ignition is turned OFF.

Separate the wiring harness connector from the ignition module at the distributor. Inspect for dirt, corrosion and damage. Reconnect the harness if no problems are found.

Push the connector tabs together to separate.

Attach a 12 volt DC test light between the coil Tach terminal and an engine ground, then crank the engine. If the light flashes or is continuous:

Turn the ignition switch OFF.

Disengage the ignition coil connector on top of the coil and inspect for dirt, corrosion and/or damage.

Using an ohmmeter, measure the ignition coil primary resistance from the positive (+) to the negative (-) terminal of the ignition coil.

The ohmmeter reading should be 0.3-1.0 ohms. If the reading is less than 0.3 ohms or greater than 1.0 ohms, the ignition coil should be replaced.

Using an ohmmeter, measure the coil secondary resistance; connect it to the negative (-) terminal and the high voltage terminal.

The resistance should be 6,500-11,500 ohms with the ohmmeter set on ohms x 1000. If the reading is less than 6,500 ohms or greater than 11,500 ohms, replace the ignition coil.

The coil primary is the small 2 wire connector and the secondary is the coil output to the distributor. To measure the secondary, measure from the primary negative to the coil output.

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Tuesday, May 29th, 2007 AT 10:11 AM
Tiny
JHCHALLIS
  • MEMBER

OK, I am back. I appreciate all of your help. But was in the process of moving. I have finished my move and would like to update you on the car. I drove the car about 600 miles (my wife follwed). The first 550 or so went pretty well with the only issue was getting the car to start again when fueling or when we stopped over night. The last 50 miles or so, the car suddenly began to slow and the pedal would not respond. The car acted a though it was flooding really bad and backfired several times. I limped it to a gas station, filled up and replaced the fuel pressure regulator since it was the most obvious problem. The car started OK and ran decent until the last 3-4 miles when it started flooding out again. I parked it and now it is back to not wanting to start and not wanting to idle. It will start, but idling is out of the question. I have conducted all of the tests you recommended before and everything seems to check out. Still no check engine light and the code scanner comes back with system pass. Any suggestions?

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Monday, July 23rd, 2007 AT 1:45 AM

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