1999 Ford F-150 Starting

Tiny
QTIP31
  • MEMBER
  • 1999 FORD F-150
  • V8
  • 2WD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 130,000 MILES
My 1999 F150 will not start or turn over at all instead it just clicks once. I've had this problem before and I would just put it in nuetral and it would turn over but now nothing will get the engine to turn over at all only just a click sound.
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Tuesday, December 16th, 2008 AT 5:09 PM

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Tiny
DAVE H
  • EXPERT
Also check the BOO (brake on/off) switch on the brake pedal?

TROUBLE SHOOTING
Check the following items before proceeding with testing:
Check battery for state of charge.
Check cable connections at battery and starter motor.
Ensure transmission is fully engaged in Park or Neutral position or clutch pedal is fully depressed.
Check system fuses.
On models equipped with anti-theft system, ensure anti-theft system is operating properly. See appropriate ANTI-THEFT SYSTEMS article for additional information.
ON-VEHICLE TESTING
CAUTION:When battery is disconnected, vehicle computer and memory systems may lose memory data. Driveability problems may exist until computer systems have completed a relearn cycle. See COMPUTER RELEARN PROCEDURES article in GENERAL INFORMATION before disconnecting battery. Before testing starter, ensure transmission is in Park or Neutral.

VOLTAGE DROP TEST
NOTE:Make all voltmeter connections at component terminal rather than at cable or wire end.

Ensure battery is fully charged. Disconnect ignition coil connector from ignition coil to prevent vehicle from starting. Connect remote starter switch between starter solenoid terminal "S" and positive battery post. Connect positive voltmeter lead to positive battery post, and negative lead to solenoid terminal "M". See Fig. 1.
Fig. 1: Testing Voltage Drop
Courtesy of FORD MOTOR CO.
Engage remote starter switch. Voltmeter should indicate.5 volt or less. If voltmeter indicates.5 volt or less, go to STARTER GROUND CIRCUIT TEST. If voltmeter indicates greater than.5 volt, go to next step.
Move negative voltmeter lead to solenoid terminal "B". Engage remote starter switch. If voltmeter indicates less than.5 volt, solenoid connections or contacts are bad. Clean solenoid terminals "B", "S" and "M". Repeat steps 1 -3.
If voltmeter still indicates greater than.5 volt at terminal "M" and less than.5 volt at terminal "B", solenoid contacts are bad. Replace starter motor. See STARTER MOTOR under REMOVAL & INSTALLATION. If voltmeter indicates greater than.5 volt at terminal "B", clean cables and connections at solenoid.
If voltmeter still indicates greater than.5 volt at terminal "B", check for poor positive battery cable connection or bad cable. Repair as necessary.
STARTER GROUND CIRCUIT TEST
NOTE:Make all voltmeter connections at component terminal rather than at cable or wire end.

Disconnect ignition coil connector from ignition coil to prevent vehicle from starting. Connect remote starter switch between starter solenoid terminal "S" and positive battery post. Connect positive voltmeter lead to starter housing, and negative lead to negative battery post. See Fig. 2.
Engage remote starter switch while observing voltmeter. Voltmeter should indicate.2 volt or less. If voltmeter indicates greater than.2 volt, clean negative cable connections at battery and engine.
If voltage drop is still excessive, repair or replace negative battery cable and/or engine ground cable as necessary. Repeat starter circuit test after repair to ensure problem has been corrected.
If battery and cables test okay and starter motor still cranks slowly or not at all, replace starter motor. See STARTER MOTOR under REMOVAL & INSTALLATION.
Fig. 2: Testing Starter Ground Circuit
Courtesy of FORD MOTOR CO.
SYSTEM TESTS
ENGINE DOES NOT CRANK OR RELAY CLICKS
Verify battery condition. If battery is okay, measure voltage between each Red wire at starter relay and ground. Battery voltage should be present at one Red wire only. If battery voltage is present on one Red wire, go to next step. If battery voltage is not present on either Red wire, repair or replace Red wire between battery and starter relay cable. Check system operation.
Measure voltage between starter motor solenoid "B" terminal and ground. See Fig. 3. If battery voltage is present, go to next step. If battery voltage is not present, clean and tighten battery and solenoid terminal connections. If battery voltage is still not present, replace positive battery cable. Check system operation.
Fig. 3: Identifying Starter Solenoid Terminals (Typical)
Courtesy of FORD MOTOR CO.
Using jumper wire, connect one end to positive battery terminal and with other end, momentarily touch starter solenoid "S" terminal. See Fig. 3. If solenoid engages, go to next step. If solenoid does not engage, replace starter motor. See STARTER MOTOR under REMOVAL & INSTALLATION. Check system operation.
Using heavy gauge jumper wire, connect one end to positive battery terminal and with other end, momentarily touch starter solenoid "M" terminal. See Fig. 3. If starter spins, go to next step. If starter does not spin, replace starter motor. See STARTER MOTOR under REMOVAL & INSTALLATION. Check system operation.
Disconnect starter relay connectors. Disconnect starter motor solenoid connectors. Measure resistance of Red wire between starter relay and starter solenoid. If resistance is less than 5 ohms, replace starter relay. If resistance is 5 ohms or greater, repair or replace Red wire between starter relay and starter solenoid. Check system operation.
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Tuesday, December 16th, 2008 AT 6:28 PM

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