Explorer Starts, idle raises, then DIES?

Tiny
FRANCHISE
  • MEMBER
  • FORD EXPLORER
Hi. I have a very peculiar issue with my 1993 Ford Explorer XLT, 142K, 4.0L V6. This truck is important to me b/c it is my only mode of transportation since I am in graduate school.

I routinely maintain this vehicle, but today the truck started like normal, idle raised twice, then just slowly stumbled and died. I tried to restart but it would not turnover. I tried it on and off and nothing. Finally it went and did the same thing. After fussing with it, I finally got it to go and it drove fine.

The battery, starter are good, I even tried to replace the ignition coil. But that was fine.

No idea. Makes no sense unless it is a sensor, but there is no way to check b/c it has no computer hookup.

How do I solve this? What could it be?
Thanks.
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Monday, January 15th, 2007 AT 5:18 PM

10 Replies

Tiny
SERVICE WRITER
  • EXPERT
Graduate school huh? Better check the spelling on your signature :lol:

Try cleaning the MAF, may not be it but a good start.

Many Explorer owners have experienced "bogging" or "missing" or just unsteady performance in their 4.0 engine and have been frustrated by lots of expensive "non-fixes". Ford has these problems more than other makes and the 4.0 engine seems to be more susceptible to the problem than other Ford engines.

It seems that a "missing" engine culprit is actually the computer's sensor inside the Mass Air Flow Sensor (MAF). It eventually just gets a little dirty or builds up its own patina in the filament wires. A dirty or slightly patinated filament will send the wrong air reading to the computer, saying it is getting more air than it really is and the computer will tell the EFI to send in the wrong mix of fuel, thus, the bogging. The patina seems to form faster if you live in a damp climate. If you have had bogging or missing or idle spots, about every 25K miles plan on this quick cleaning job:
When your engine is cool, remove the wiring clip from the side of the black plastic sensor part of the MAF aluminum body. To remove the MAF interior sensor wire, you will need a Security Star (Size T15 or T20) screwdriver or screwdriver bit for a power screwdriver. Remove the two security star-head screws and carefully remove the sensor. You will see the two sensor filaments they look almost like the filaments on a light bulb. Carefully spray the filaments with an O2 safe carburetor cleaner, such as Gumout. Let it dry thoroughly. I help mine along with a careful blast or two of canned dry air. While it is drying carefully wipe the aluminum mount surface of the MAF body if there is any dust there, but be careful not to get dust in the mount hole. When the sensor is dry, replace the sensor back in the MAF body and secure with the security star-head screws. These don't need to be torqued down, just simply hand tight. Replace the wiring clip. Then start up your engine.
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Monday, January 15th, 2007 AT 5:28 PM
Tiny
FRANCHISE
  • MEMBER
Service Writer,

Thanks for proofreading.I did it quick, but the signature is changed. Thanks for your sharpness.

I will clean the MAF sensor and see.

Do you think that it could be the Idle Air Bypass Controller?

If so, is it possible to clean?

Thanks.
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Tuesday, January 16th, 2007 AT 5:14 PM
Tiny
SERVICE WRITER
  • EXPERT
Yes it could, have a gasket on hand when you do it.
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Tuesday, January 16th, 2007 AT 5:46 PM
Tiny
FRANCHISE
  • MEMBER
Service Writer,

Thanks for the reply.

Is the IAB difficult to take apart? Is there anything I should look out for?

Thanks.
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Tuesday, January 16th, 2007 AT 5:57 PM
Tiny
HEAVYDUTY
  • MEMBER
Vacuum leak. Check vacuum tree at rear drivers side if intake manifold for soft or disconnected lines
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Wednesday, January 17th, 2007 AT 9:40 PM
Tiny
FRANCHISE
  • MEMBER
Thanks for all the info.
It is just weird that it has been fine since.

I will clean them tomorrow and let you know.

THanks again.
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Saturday, January 20th, 2007 AT 9:19 AM
Tiny
SERVICE WRITER
  • EXPERT
It knew you contacted us! 8)
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Saturday, January 20th, 2007 AT 12:03 PM
Tiny
FRANCHISE
  • MEMBER
Guys,

thanks a ton for the advice, but not a problem since I posted. Unfortunately I was unable to clean the MAF and Bypass, but is on my list soon.

Thanks again for all the advice and support,
Franchise
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Saturday, February 3rd, 2007 AT 9:53 AM
Tiny
SERVICE WRITER
  • EXPERT
Probably a piece of carbon that finally worked free.


http://www.2carpros.com/forum/automotive_pictures/30961_gasgauge_2.jpg

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Saturday, February 3rd, 2007 AT 11:50 AM
Tiny
BHUGG
  • MEMBER
Just a thought. I had an issue with my 1993 explorer where the engine would just die. There didn't seem to be any consistancy in when it died or any cause. It turned out to be the electronic engine control relay. It is a small box relay under the hood and it was about $4 back then.
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Friday, February 9th, 2007 AT 10:59 PM

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