Engine shuts off when you give it any throttle

Tiny
MYTROUBLE
  • MEMBER
  • 1994 TOYOTA CAMRY
  • 3.0L
  • 6 CYL
  • FWD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 320,000 MILES
When I start the car it will idle fine but as soon as you try to give it any gas it smothers out and quits running. I have replaced the following with no results, fuel pump, fuel filter, pressure regulator, spark plugs, three coils. It straightened up for a day after I changed the the fuel regulator but then did the same thing again. I have tried pulling the codes but cannot get the engine light to flash when I use a paper clip in the Diagnostic's plug under the hood. Please any help will be appreciated.
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Thursday, June 1st, 2017 AT 12:43 AM

4 Replies

Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
Check the fresh air tube between the mass air flow sensor and the throttle body. That cannot have loose hose clamps, cracks, or any other leaks. If any air sneaks in that does not go through the mass air flow sensor, it will not get measured and no fuel will be commanded to go with it.
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Thursday, June 1st, 2017 AT 1:19 AM
Tiny
MYTROUBLE
  • MEMBER
I will check. I will check that here in a few minutes and let you know.
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Thursday, June 1st, 2017 AT 4:23 AM
Tiny
MYTROUBLE
  • MEMBER
I've tried everything you suggested but still have the same failure of no idle and not accepting any throttle. I am at my wit's end and ready to torch this car I hope you have another idea
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Thursday, June 1st, 2017 AT 7:57 PM
Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
I've had the same frustration with tvs and car radios!

First try to read the fault codes with a scanner. '95 and older vehicles were pretty sparse with their codes, but if you can get in, look at sensor data to see what the Engine Computer is seeing. Incorrect temperature sensor readings cause some odd fuel-related performance problems. What you have to keep in mind with sensors is there is a range of readings the computer will accept as correct, even though they might be wrong. For example, the throttle position sensor is typically fed with 5.0 volts, then the acceptable range of signal voltage is approximately 0.5 to 4.5 volts. Anything outside that range sets a fault code. At idle the voltage will be 0.5 volts. While this is not a practical example, use it to illustrate my wondrous point. If the signal voltage was 2.7 volts while the throttle was closed, that would be the wrong voltage, but it would not set a fault code because 2.7 volts is within the acceptable range. This is where you have to compare all the readings to the actual operating conditions, and try to identify one that doesn't make sense.

Pay particular attention to the MAP sensor. Chrysler is the only manufacturer that has been able to make an engine run right without a mass air flow sensor. They do everything with the MAP sensor, which is extremely accurate to a level even more so that what is used. Other manufacturers usually also have a MAP sensor, but it can be for back-up strategy when the mass air flow sensor has a problem, only for barometric pressure readings, or it could be a second input for engine load. I don't know if any of that pertains to your engine, but see if that voltage responds to changes in manifold vacuum like it should.
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Saturday, June 3rd, 2017 AT 4:46 PM

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