Dome light will not shut off

Tiny
SYNKRNCTY
  • MEMBER
  • 2004 CHRYSLER PT CRUISER
  • MANUAL
  • 60,000 MILES
My dome light will not shut off, and it is getting pretty hot. Aside from removing the bulb (temporary fix) is there a fuse I can pull for just that light? I do not want it to wear down the battery until I can track down the actual issue (door sensor, short, etc.).
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Wednesday, June 7th, 2017 AT 3:54 PM

4 Replies

Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
The best suspect is a rear door switch that is out of adjustment. Open just one door at a time, then press the switch to see if the dome light goes off. If it does, describe the switch, then I will tell you how to fix it.

The dome light is fed from fuse 13, a ten-amp in the dash fuse box, but it also feeds the cargo lamp and the visor vanity lamps. The visor lamps are on their own circuit with their own switches. The cargo lamp, however, is grounded along with the dome light, so both should be on at the same time.

The wiring diagram shows the circuit being grounded to turn the lights on, but there is no way to tell which of the two computer modules does that. There is an "overhead console module" and the instrument cluster.

The door switches are inputs to the Instrument cluster, then it appears the cluster sends a signal to the overhead console module. I cannot find the location of the module, but I did find the pin-out drawing of the connector. Use that to verify when you think you have found that module. What I think I would do is unplug the module. If the dome light does not tun off, suspect the instrument cluster or a stuck door switch. If the lights do turn off, we will need to take some voltage readings on the back of the instrument cluster to determine if a front door switch is stuck. Those are built int the latch assemblies.

Before we get to the instrument cluster, you may be able to get a hint by opening and closing the front doors. Watch for even the slightest flickering when the doors are being moved or when the door is latched and unlatched. That would indicate whatever you're doing is affecting the problem, and is pointing to the suspect.
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Wednesday, June 7th, 2017 AT 10:30 PM
Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
I looked up the door switches and only found a reference to front door switches, and they are not in the latch assemblies. Is your car a two-door, and do you have regular door switches?
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Wednesday, June 7th, 2017 AT 10:34 PM
Tiny
SYNKRNCTY
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It's a four door with manual locks. Not sure what you mean by switches. I pulled the bulb out of the overhead lamp, that saved the battery but now where the trip meter is, there's a flashing message that says "no fuse". I didn't remove any fuses, unless that "bulb" was a fuse with a lighting filament. Thanks for the replies, Caradiodoc
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Friday, June 16th, 2017 AT 7:38 AM
Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
All cars have door switches that turn on the interior lights. On a few models, the engineers have built them into the latch assemblies so they can't be serviced separately. That saves them time on the assembly line but makes repairs more expensive for the car owners.

You have individual inexpensive switches on the front doors. They look like little black teardrops. I added a photo of one with some nifty arrows.

Did you do the test I mentioned in the first paragraph of my first reply? That would identify if one of these switches is causing the light to stay on. If you press a switch and the light goes off, that switch has become over-adjusted. The blue arrow is pointing to the round head of what looks like a giant plastic nail. The cylinder it slides into is the actual switch. The first time the door is closed, that cylinder gets pushed in as far as it can go, then that "nail" gets forced into the cylinder as far as necessary, by the door. With enough slamming, the door can close too far, then bounce back out a little from the foam weatherstrip, but by that time the nail got pushed in too far. That prevents it from pushing the cylinder in far enough to turn the switch off.

The immediate fix is to pull that nail out about 1/4". The red arrow is pointing to one of two tiny notches where you can insert a pick to pry the nail out. Once you do that, it will self-adjust when you close the door. That will solve the light-staying-on problem, but it is likely to happen again over time. To prevent that, pull that nail all the way out, slide three M5 metric lock washers onto it, then install the nail that way. Those will prevent the nail from over-adjusting. For a professional touch, when I do that repair, I paint the washers with black touch-up paint so the silver doesn't stick out like a sore thumb.
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Friday, June 16th, 2017 AT 4:24 PM

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