2001 Dodge Ram Hard Start

Tiny
NORTHSHORE1
  • MEMBER
  • 2001 DODGE RAM
  • V8
  • 4WD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 74,000 MILES
My 2001 Dodge Ram 1500 with a 5.9 engine never starts on the first crank and always starts on the second crank. If I restart in 10 minutes or so, it starts right up. Any longer, then it's back to 2 cranks. The fuel pressure jumps right up to 45PSI when the key is turned to the on position. But it drops right down to 0 after the key is turned off. Is this normal? Shouldn't the fuel rail always have some kind of pressure reading?
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Thursday, March 19th, 2009 AT 6:47 PM

11 Replies

Tiny
NORTHSHORE1
  • MEMBER
Should have included this info.
No codes.I checked
Truck runs fine except for the hard start condition. The plugs are fairly new. Bosch Platinum.
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Thursday, March 19th, 2009 AT 7:50 PM
Tiny
JACOBANDNICKOLAS
  • EXPERT
The fuel pressure rinning should be between 44 and 54 PSI. When you shut it, the pressure shouldn't drop below 30 PSI for 5 minutes. If it does drop, you have a leak. Try this:

Start the engine and allow it to warm up. Next, clamp off rubber hose portion of fuel line pressure test addapter between fuel rail and test port T on fuel line pressure tester adapter. NOTE SHUT ENGINE WHEN YOU CLAMP THE RUBBER HOSE. If the pressure does not fall below 30 PSI within 5 minutes, the fuel rail or an injector is leaking. Next, do the same, but place the clamp between the rubber hose of the fuel line pressure tester adapter and the fuel line and test port T on fuel line pressure tester adapter. If it doesn't fall, the injectors and fuel rail is good. That leaves a fuel pump check valve, fuel pressure regulator check valve or a leak in the fuel line.

NOTE: A slow pressure leak usually indicates a bad check valve in the fuel pump. A quick drop usually indicates a bad check valve in the fuel filter or regulator.

Let me know if this helps and what you find.

Joe
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Thursday, March 19th, 2009 AT 9:46 PM
Tiny
NORTHSHORE1
  • MEMBER
If the fuel rail was leaking, I would have definately seen this so I think I can rule that out. I think I understand what you what me to do. You want me to isolate the injectors from the fuel rail back to the pump module to see which is causing the sudden pressure drop. Just so we're on the same page. When the truck is running, the pressure is 51PSI so I think we're good there. When I shut the truck off, the pressure drops to 0 PSI immediately. So either an injector is staying open or the fuel pressure regulator / filter/ check valve is faulty. So with the engine running and the pressure guage screwed in to the test port, clamp the rubber part of the fuel line just before the fuel rail then shut the engine off. If the pressure drops, then it's an injector. If not, then it's the pressure regulator on the fuel pump module, correct? I think that the way it dropped off immediately with my first test, it's going to be the pressure regualator. But I'll try the test you reccommended tomorrow morning and let you know the results. Thanks!
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Friday, March 20th, 2009 AT 4:46 PM
Tiny
JACOBANDNICKOLAS
  • EXPERT
You have been around cars for awhile to have understood what I said. Yes, I'm trying to determine which part of the system is leaking. I feel very confident the quick pressure bleed off is causing the hard start. I doubled checked it in the manual (mitchell online) and all of the pressures I gave you are accurate. And the bleed of times are correct too.

Let me know what you find, and yes again, you nailed it.

Joe
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Friday, March 20th, 2009 AT 8:49 PM
Tiny
JLINDEMAN
  • MEMBER
I have the same problem on my 2001 Dodge Ram.
I had bosch platinum plugs with only about 10,000 miles on them when my truck would just up and stall, sometimes while driving at 60 mph, then start right back up. The local dodge mechanic said that magnum engines don't like platinum plugs. I changed plugs and no problems since.
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Saturday, March 21st, 2009 AT 4:36 PM
Tiny
NORTHSHORE1
  • MEMBER
Hi Joe,

Couldn't really perform that test you suggested. The line supplying the fuel rail won't crimp, (too rigid). The speed at which the fuel pressure drops when I turn the truck off is pointing me back to the pump and the regulator valve, unless you have any other suggestions. I'm not sure but I don't think an injector would bleed off that quickly.

Jlindeman
My truck isn't stalling. Allthough I have heard of some vehicles not liking the platinum plugs.

Thanks,
Joe
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Monday, March 23rd, 2009 AT 5:15 PM
Tiny
JACOBANDNICKOLAS
  • EXPERT
If you feel confident the rail isn't leaking, then I agree with you. I would start with the fuel filter and then the regulator. A bad check valve in the pump will leak down slower.

Let me know what you find.

Joe
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Monday, March 23rd, 2009 AT 7:07 PM
Tiny
NORTHSHORE1
  • MEMBER
The filter / regulator / check valve are all in one unit on top of the pump module. Since I'm going to drop the tank anyway, I'm going to change the pump module which will include the pump and the regulator. Don't want to drop it again. I'll let you know how that turns out, I'm planning to do it this weekend.

Joe
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Tuesday, March 24th, 2009 AT 4:48 PM
Tiny
JACOBANDNICKOLAS
  • EXPERT
I don't blame you for wanting to do it all in one time. They are not too much fun to remove and replace. Just try to run as much gas out of it as you can so the tank is lighter.

Hell, on the second generation Dakota, I was able to remove the bed (easier access) to access the pump in 20 minutes, as long as I had someone to help lift it off, but the full size don't go that fast. Let me know.

Joe
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Tuesday, March 24th, 2009 AT 4:56 PM
Tiny
NORTHSHORE1
  • MEMBER
Hey Joe, good news! The changing of the fuel pump module did the trick. The truck starts cold or hot like new on the first crank every time. I'm sure the pressure regulator / filter / check valve was the culprit, but changing the entire pump module was the only way to go. I'm now sure that the fuel in the rail was draining back to the tank evey time I shut the engine off, thereby creating the hard start condition. Thanks for all your help!

Joe
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Friday, March 27th, 2009 AT 6:14 PM
Tiny
JACOBANDNICKOLAS
  • EXPERT
Hi:
I'm sorry it took a few days to get back with you. I just got out of the hospital with one of the worst flus I ever had.

I'm glad it's fixed. And you're right, the fuel pressure was leaking back to the tank. If you have any questions in the future, let us know.

Joe
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Monday, March 30th, 2009 AT 2:44 PM

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