2005 Dodge Neon Check Engine Light

Tiny
KENATWOOD
  • MEMBER
  • 2005 DODGE NEON
  • 4 CYL
  • FWD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 28,000 MILES
I haven't run my car for 2 days. Today when I got in it to go to the store, I noticed my check engine light was on and was not blinking but was steady. I did the test that my manuel said to do and no blinking occurred during this test. So what is the major problem that is usually caused by this? I drove to the store and back fine which was only 2 miles each way.
I hear that it used to be the oxygen sensor that was the main reason but now days it could be anything?
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Sunday, May 24th, 2009 AT 12:25 PM

3 Replies

Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
You heard wrong about the oxygen sensor. It is one of the least likely to set a diagnostic fault code because so many conditions must be met.

Cycling the ignition switch used to cause the Check Engine light to flash out a series of two-digit codes that would indicate the circuit or system with a problem, not the actual component. On newer cars, the codes are displayed in the digital odometer.

The diagnostic fault codes are divided into different groups according to severity. Only the most severe will cause the Check Engine light to flash while driving. That means way too much unburned fuel is about to do permanent damage to the catalytic converter in the exhaust system.

Caradiodoc
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Wednesday, June 3rd, 2009 AT 4:20 PM
Tiny
KENATWOOD
  • MEMBER
Guess what. It is the oxygen sensor. It actually is a wire that boke in helf so I'm gonna try and splice it back together for now.
Kenatwood
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Wednesday, June 3rd, 2009 AT 5:35 PM
Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
If it works, wonderful. But be aware, all O2 sensors compare the oxygen in the exhaust stream to the oxygen in the atmosphere. Most sensors get their air sample through an opening between the four wires where they enter the sensor. It is possible to render them ineffective by getting carried away with rustproofing.

A few sensors draw their external air sample through one of the wires, between the wire and its insulation. Those wires can not be spliced; you'll have to replace the entire sensor.

Sorry that I can't remember which brands or models of car used those sensors, but just in case you still have trouble after the repair, consider having it tested by a professional. Their equipment will show the reading switching from rich to lean many times per second if it's working correctly. If it doesn't switch normally, the engine computer will detect that and set one or more appropriate diagnostic codes in memory, but there is a series of conditions that must be met before it will rely on any self-test results. If all the conditions are met, and the computer sees a problem, a typical fault code might be "O2 not switching from rich to lean". There are other fault codes that will not cause the Check Engine light to turn on but if set in memory, they can prevent some self tests from running.

Caradiodoc
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Wednesday, June 3rd, 2009 AT 9:19 PM

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