2002 Dodge Caravan Cylinder 1 misfire

Tiny
GREGD383
  • MEMBER
  • 2002 DODGE CARAVAN
  • 6 CYL
  • FWD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 78,500 MILES
Hello,
My check engine light came on about a month ago. I did the self check and the error code came back as
P031: Cylinder 1 Misfire

I ran a few bottles of injector cleaner with no help. I changed the plugs and wires, no help.

I then changed the coil, no help.

I am thinking it could be the injector, but I am not sure how I can test it. Is there a simple way without having to remove it or could it be something else causing this error code?
Thanks for your help!
Greg
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Monday, January 19th, 2009 AT 8:48 PM

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Tiny
DAVE H
  • EXPERT
Check wiring or clean/replace the CMP/CKP

Camshaft Position (CMP) sensor is located on rear of cylinder head, just below valve cover. CMP sensor uses a target magnet attached to rear of camshaft and uses locating dowels for proper positioning.
As target magnet rotates, CMP sensor senses the change in the polarity. The polarity change causes CMP sensor output voltage to switch from high-voltage of 5 volts (at magnet north pole) to a low-voltage of.3 volt (at magnet south pole). CMP sensor delivers input signal to Powertrain Control Module (PCM). PCM uses this input signal along with input signal from Crankshaft Position (CKP) sensor for determining crankshaft position for fuel injection synchronization and cylinder identification.

Camshaft Position Sensor (3.3L & 3.8L)
Camshaft Position (CMP) sensor is located on top of timing chain cover, just below thermostat housing. End of CMP sensor is located directly above camshaft sprocket. A notched ring is mounted on front of camshaft sprocket.
As camshaft rotates, CMP sensor generates pulses due to notch areas on the notched ring. When solid metal area on notched ring passes below CMP sensor, voltage decreases to less than.5 volt. When notch on notched ring aligns with bottom of CMP sensor, voltage increases to 5 volts. Switching of the voltage generates pulses. These pulses provide an input signal to Powertrain Control Module (PCM). PCM uses input signal along with Crankshaft Position (CKP) sensor input signal for determining fuel injection synchronization and cylinder identification.

Crankshaft Position Sensor (2.4L)
Crankshaft Position (CKP) sensor is located on cylinder block, behind generator, near oil filter. Crankshaft contains a crankshaft pulse ring which contains 2 sets of notches ground into the No. 2 counterweight.
As crankshaft rotates, CKP sensor generates pulses due to notch areas on the No. 2 counterweight. When solid area on crankshaft pulse ring aligns with bottom of CKP sensor, voltage decreases to less than.3 volt.
When notch area on crankshaft ring aligns with bottom of CKP sensor, voltage increases to 5 volts. Switching of the voltage generates pulses. These pulses provide an input signal to the Powertrain Control Module (PCM). PCM uses input signal to determine crankshaft position. PCM uses input signal along with other various input signals for controlling fuel injection synchronization and ignition system.

Crankshaft Position Sensor (3.3L & 3.8L)
Crankshaft Position (CKP) sensor is located on top of transaxle housing, above flywheel, near corner of rear exhaust manifold.
Flywheel contains 3 sets of slots areas near starter ring. Each slot area contains 4 slots in each set. As crankshaft rotates, CKP sensor generates pulses due to slot areas on the flywheel.
When solid area on flywheel aligns with bottom of CKP sensor, voltage decreases to less than.3 volt. When slot area on flywheel aligns with bottom of CKP sensor, voltage increases to 5 volts. Switching of the voltage generates pulses. These pulses provide an input signal to the Powertrain Control Module (PCM). PCM uses input signal to determine crankshaft position. PCM uses input signal along with other various input signals for controlling fuel injection synchronization and ignition system.
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Monday, January 19th, 2009 AT 9:09 PM

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