1995 Chrysler Intrepid trouble starting

Tiny
GARNZY
  • MEMBER
  • 1995 CHRYSLER INTREPID
  • 6 CYL
  • FWD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 143,000 MILES
My chrysler intrepid runs real good when it wants to start. It seems like I have to have it plugged in when it is not even cold out. That seems to help somewhat.I replaced the plugs with premium ones and also the wires. Idont know if it is getting fuel to the injectors or giving too much, which doesnt make sense. It cranks over and over until I hold my foot to the floor, let it crank for 5 seconds and then it starts. The motor gets flooded cause it puffs black after it starts. Would you have somekind of diagnosis.I really want to save my catalytic converter, if it evers malfunctions, can the cat be cut out of these cars? Thank you
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Wednesday, March 25th, 2009 AT 10:00 PM

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Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
DO NOT REMOVE THE CATALYTIC CONVERTER! Repair shops will likely loose their license for doing this. The cause should be fixed, not the result.

Does the engine restart ok if it's been off for just a few minutes? If so, you might have leaking fuel injectors. The next time you think the long crank time will occur, turn the ignition switch to "Run" for a few seconds but don't crank the engine. Turn the ignition switch back off, then to run again, and maybe do it a third time. Every time you do that, the fuel pump will run for up to two seconds. This will build up the fuel pressure that should always be there to start the engine. Leaky injectors will bleed this pressure off. It takes a lot of cranking to build the pressure back up because the insufficient pressure that IS there bleeds off almost as fast as it can be built up.

If it is indeed leaking injectors, I would not worry about the catalytic converter. The unburned fuel will be long gone before the converter warms up to burn it. What is a bigger concern is the raw fuel washing down into the engine oil. If you do a lot of short trip driving, the build up of fuel will dilute the oil reducing its lubricating properties. This will lead to severe engine damage. If you do a lot of longer trip driving, the raw fuel will tend to burn off and be drawn out by the emissions system to be burned in the engine but can lead to sludge buildup.
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Sunday, March 29th, 2009 AT 6:59 PM

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