2007 Honda Accord Fuel Consumption

Tiny
SGOYAL
  • MEMBER
  • 2007 HONDA ACCORD
  • 2.4L
  • 4 CYL
  • 2WD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 50,000 MILES
This car is EPA rated 21/31/25. I had been getting 25 mpg in the summer and about 22 mpg in the winter in about 90% city driving. Last winter, the car got 15 mpg with similar driving. I took the car to the Honda dealer and they could not find anything that would contribute to the low winter mileage. This summer the car was back to 25 mpg but it's already at about 19-20 mpg and I'm certain it's headed to 15 mpg as winter approaches. Please help.
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Friday, November 6th, 2015 AT 8:25 AM

6 Replies

Tiny
WRENCHTECH
  • EXPERT
It could have something to do with the quality of the fuel and the percentage of Ethanol they are putting in as they switch formulas in the fuel for summer and winter. They are also very erratic on the amount of Ethanol they put in.
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Friday, November 6th, 2015 AT 9:43 AM
Tiny
SGOYAL
  • MEMBER
Would the percentage of Ethanol affect every car? How can I be certain that this is causing the mileage drop? I tried different gas stations last winter but saw no difference in the mileage.
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Friday, November 6th, 2015 AT 9:48 AM
Tiny
WRENCHTECH
  • EXPERT
All I can do is offer possible causes. I can't know where your mileage went over the Internet.
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Friday, November 6th, 2015 AT 9:49 AM
Tiny
SGOYAL
  • MEMBER
That's fair. Can you think of anything else and will anyone else at your end weigh in on this? Thanks.
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Friday, November 6th, 2015 AT 10:32 AM
Tiny
2CARPROS MIKE
  • ADMIN
According to the U.S. Department of Energy:

E10 and E15 are blends of ethanol and gasoline the number after the "E" indicates the percentage of ethanol by volume.

Most of the gasoline sold in the U.S. Contains up to 10% ethanol the amount varies by region and all auto manufacturers approve blends up to E10 in their gasoline vehicles.

As of 2011, EPA began allowing the use of E15 in model year 2001 and newer gasoline vehicles.2 Pumps dispensing E15 must be labeled (see example). The vehicle owner's manual may indicate the manufacturer's maximum recommended ethanol content.

Since ethanol contains about two-thirds as much energy as gasoline, vehicles will typically go 3% to 4% fewer miles per gallon on E10 and 4% to 5% fewer on E15 than on 100% gasoline.
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Monday, November 9th, 2015 AT 9:47 AM
Tiny
WRENCHTECH
  • EXPERT
I recently went to a fuel system training class and they spent a lot of time talking about lean codes that could not be resolved that the engineers traced back to fuel that tested to have much more ethanol that claimed.

They tested samples from a number of local stations and the results were all over the board.
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Monday, November 9th, 2015 AT 10:57 AM

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