2001 Jeep Wrangler wont start

Tiny
RIOTBOYER
  • MEMBER
  • 2001 JEEP WRANGLER
  • 6 CYL
  • 4WD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 85,000 MILES
I have a 2001 Jeep Wrangler. I never had any problems with it, I worked for like 5 hours one night, came out and my battery was completely dead. I had a buddy jump it for me. It took about 10 minutes before it was able to even start up. I tried to get it home and it died after about 45 seconds of me driving it. He drove me home and I came back with with my girlfriend and we tried jumping it. I started it by pressing the gas, but when I released, it would die right away. I eventually got it to stay started by lightly pressing the gas. I wanted to make sure it was good before I tried driving it home so I turned it off and tried turning it on again but it wouldnt start. Im trying to figure out what is wrong so I can fix it. I really cant afford to have it towed to a repair shop and pay a repair bill. My girlfriend thinks its the starter, her mechanic friend that she texted said it could be the spark plugs, the guy who tried jumping me says its the alternator. I believe its either that or the battery. Does anything jump out at you?
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Tuesday, July 5th, 2011 AT 4:34 PM

11 Replies

Tiny
JDL
  • EXPERT
Make sure the battery has a full charge and the connections are clean and tight. Next, check the charging system. Do you have a digital multimeter, so you can do some testing? If battery voltage is lost, the vehicle may not run well, because of idle relearn issue. Losing battery voltage can cause all kinds of issues, besides the battery being down.
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Tuesday, July 5th, 2011 AT 5:10 PM
Tiny
RIOTBOYER
  • MEMBER
Ill check the connection, The battery was fully dead. It shows that its half charged when I have it hooked up to another battery. I dont have a digital multimeter. How do I make sure the battery has a full charge? How long should I jump it for?
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Tuesday, July 5th, 2011 AT 5:19 PM
Tiny
JDL
  • EXPERT
Some of the national brand autostores will load-test and charge the battery for you. If your going to work on your own vehicles, at the least, you need a digital multimeter. As far as trying to charge off another battery, I don't know what to tell you?
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Tuesday, July 5th, 2011 AT 5:59 PM
Tiny
RIOTBOYER
  • MEMBER
Thanks for the help. Iv also been advised to try changing the battery because it sounds like it has a deadcell since it wont hold the charge. The battery is kinda old so replacing it will be an improvment either way
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Tuesday, July 5th, 2011 AT 6:13 PM
Tiny
JDL
  • EXPERT
If a new battery doesn't fix it, let us know. Some of the national brand autostores will check the charging system for you.
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Tuesday, July 5th, 2011 AT 6:53 PM
Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
Hi JDL. Remember the "minimum throttle relearn"?
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Tuesday, July 5th, 2011 AT 6:53 PM
Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
Oops. Forgot to mention, this has the Chrysler Engine Computer system.
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Tuesday, July 5th, 2011 AT 6:54 PM
Tiny
JDL
  • EXPERT
Hey caradiodoc, have a good day.
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Tuesday, July 5th, 2011 AT 7:14 PM
Tiny
RIOTBOYER
  • MEMBER
I took the battery out, advance auto parts checked it and it was bad, so I got a new one, replaced it. It started, I took the negative charge off and it stayed running, so looks like it was just the battery. Thanks guys.
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Tuesday, July 5th, 2011 AT 8:41 PM
Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
AAAAAGGGGGHHHHHH! DO NOT REMOVE THE BATTERY CABLE WHILE THE ENGINE IS RUNNING! That is a real easy way to destroy many of the computers. That was a trick done many years ago by mechanics who didn't understand how charging systems work, but those cars didn't have computers. Without the battery to help the voltage regulator hold system voltage down, if you speed up the engine, it is real easy for system voltage to go well over 30 volts.

Use a voltmeter to test the charging system. With the engine running, battery voltage must be between 13.75 and 14.75 volts. If it is, the system is working.

Your original problem was simply caused by running the battery dead. The Engine Computer lost its memory, and until it relearns "minimum throttle", the idle speed will be too low which is what you described. The new battery didn't fix the problem. The fix was to drive it at highway speed with the engine warmed up, then coast for at least seven seconds without touching the brake or gas pedals. At that point the Engine Computer takes a reading from the throttle position sensor and puts it in memory. From then on, any time it sees that same voltage, it knows your foot is off the gas pedal and it has to be in control of idle speed.
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Tuesday, July 5th, 2011 AT 9:07 PM
Tiny
CJ MEDEVAC
  • EXPERT
Even without voltmeter abilities,

"Auto Zone" and "Advance Auto" both have a little meter that has LED lights on it (I even "had" one, for my wife's rig, I was gonna snap a pic and post it, however, she just told me she lent it to one of her employees, months ago.I reckon I need to go shopping. They're not but a few bucks!

The way you use it is Vehicle OFF touch it to the battery terminals and it will indicate whether your battery is Charged or not. Red or green light

Then you crank it and touch the terminals, it will display your alternator output, red, yellow or green as far as how well it is charging.

Probably a decent investment at less than $10

It was gray in color and maybe 1" X 1-1/2" X 4". With 2 short leads, and 5 or 6 LEDs on the front

Sorta primitive, but some people need something compact/ durable/ fool proof/ and also "doubles" as a useful gift for an employee!

The Medic
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Tuesday, July 5th, 2011 AT 11:48 PM

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