ELECTRICAL PROBLEM

  • Tiny
  • Tylerbuynoski
  • 2000 MITSUBISHI ECLIPSE
  • 4 CYL
  • 2WD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 165 MILES

Hello,
I have a 2000 Mitsubishi Eclipse. Earlier my aftermarket alarm started going off for no reason so I went out to turn it off. When I opened my car door I noticed the interior lights did not come on and when I put the key in the ignition the door open chime did not come on. I cranked up the car all the way and noticed the radio and my dash clock did not come on either. Recently I had been having problems with the a/c fuse melting completely because I believe the fuse box is shorting out. So I was wondering if when the alarm went off did it draw so much power that the fuse box just finally shorted completely out? I know it isn't a battery issue because the car will start and the headlights work and I just bought a new battery about 5 months ago.

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Friday, June 10th, 2011 AT 7:24 PM

4 Replies

  • Tiny
  • Caradiodoc
  • EXPERT
  • 25,998 POSTS

Sounds like you're overlooking a different issue. Fuses had better blow, not melt from over-current, otherwise, what good are they? Look at the terminals in the fuse box to see if they are blackened or corroded. Either of those things will cause heat to build up when current is flowing through them. THAT is what can cause plastic things to melt. Of course that's if the correct size fuses are in place.

To repair melted fuse boxes and switch connectors, you have to cut the overheated terminals out and replace them individually, and replace usually about 4" of the wires that have become hardened. All of the splices and terminals should be soldered and sealed with heat-shrink tubing. Never rely on twisting wires together and covering them with electrical tape.

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Friday, June 10th, 2011 AT 7:36 PM
  • Tiny
  • Tylerbuynoski
  • MEMBER

Would it be a good idea to also replace the whole fuse box?

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Friday, June 10th, 2011 AT 7:45 PM
  • Tiny
  • Caradiodoc
  • EXPERT
  • 25,998 POSTS

You could do that too but that's a lot of work. Rather than cut and splice the multitude of wires, there will be a way to release each terminal so you can transfer them one at a time to the new fuse box. That way you still only have to replace the overheated terminals.

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Friday, June 10th, 2011 AT 7:53 PM
  • Tiny
  • Tylerbuynoski
  • MEMBER

Okay, thank you very much.

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Friday, June 10th, 2011 AT 7:58 PM

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