1998 Chrysler Sebring Car getting no spark

Tiny
RAYRAYBABYBOI13
  • MEMBER
  • 1998 CHRYSLER SEBRING
  • 2.5L
  • 6 CYL
Ok. It seems like once a month my car has something new going one with her lately. Now she is getting no spark. The car is cranking over like no other, someone looked at it for me, only pulled out one spark plug and then told me its the crank sensor. I wanna know for sure thats wat it is because i'm sure it could be other things. I've had the car for two years now and she's never had a tune-up for instance. It has a coil pack and idk how to determine if that is good or not. Anyways i'm gonna go pull the other plugs out right now to make sure they are all not getting spark. Where should I start after this to determine the problem?

Thanks,
Ray-ray
Do you
have the same problem?
Yes
No
Monday, December 30th, 2013 AT 12:15 PM

5 Replies

Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
If you're missing spark at one spark plug wire, you're missing it at it's mate too so there's no point in wasting time looking at the others. If you were just missing spark at one spark plug, the engine would still run.

Professional mechanics are not psychic, so whoever determined the crankshaft position sensor was defective must be really good. The easiest way to know is if here's a diagnostic fault code set related to that, but it's important to understand that fault codes never say to replace parts or that they're defective. They only indicate the circuit or system that needs further diagnosis. Chrysler makes reading fault codes yourself real easy. Cycle the ignition switch from "off" to "run" three times within five seconds without cranking the engine, then watch the code numbers show up in the odometer display.

If there are no fault codes, the first step is to determine if you also have no fuel. The easiest way is to determine if the automatic shutdown relay is turning on during cranking. You'll need a test light or a digital voltmeter for that test. You listed a V-6 engine and said it has a coil pack. Coil packs were only used on the four-cylinder engines. Which engine do you really have?
Was this
answer
helpful?
Yes
No
+1
Monday, December 30th, 2013 AT 12:46 PM
Tiny
RAYRAYBABYBOI13
  • MEMBER
The guy who looked at my car was not a mechanic. So that is why I am skeptical he told me it had a coil pack but I know the car is a six cylinder. And my odometer hasn't worked since I have it so gettin a code out of her ain't gonna work. I wasn't getting a positive connection to my starter relay about a month ago but I bypassd it wit a new wire. I'll check it wit a test light again.

Thanks
Was this
answer
helpful?
Yes
No
-1
Monday, December 30th, 2013 AT 12:59 PM
Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
I'm not sure what you're trying to say in those last two sentences. How did we get from no-spark to a starter problem?
Was this
answer
helpful?
Yes
No
Monday, December 30th, 2013 AT 1:10 PM
Tiny
RAYRAYBABYBOI13
  • MEMBER
My dad told me that the wire for the stater relay can cuz no spark. Is that not true? I guess I'm lost as well
Was this
answer
helpful?
Yes
No
Monday, December 30th, 2013 AT 1:14 PM
Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
Nope. He's probably thinking of an ignition resistor bypass circuit used a long time ago. On your car there is no relation between the starter relay and the automatic shutdown (ASD) relay.

If your engine is cranking normally, you will need a code reader or scanner to read the fault codes if the odometer doesn't work. You can test the ASD circuit by measuring the voltage at any injector or either small terminal on the back of the alternator. You will see 12 volts there for one second after you turn on the ignition switch. What is important is if that voltage comes back during cranking. If it does not, the two most common suspects are the crankshaft position sensor and the camshaft position sensor inside the distributor. The cam sensor has the higher failure rate, but because of the difficulty in replacing it, most people just replace the entire distributor.

Also be sure the rotor is turning. If it is not, the timing belt is broken and valves will be damaged. That, and the loss of compression, will make the engine crank faster than normal.
Was this
answer
helpful?
Yes
No
+1
Monday, December 30th, 2013 AT 1:42 PM

Please login or register to post a reply.

Recommended Guides