Ford Taurus Overheat

Tiny
KCOLVIN8374
  • MEMBER
  • 1996 FORD TAURUS
  • 6 CYL
  • 2WD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 150 MILES
My Ford Taurus overheats rather quickly, but only at low speeds. When I get up to 40 mph or higher, temp goes down. I was told this was because the radiator, and the air flow at high speeds causes the fans to go. But I also have two other problems. The heater and air conditioning do not work. I was told by somebody that it could be some little box (I can't recall what they said what it was called) that controls all three of those. Could that be what it is?
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Saturday, May 7th, 2011 AT 4:01 AM

7 Replies

Tiny
KCOLVIN8374
  • MEMBER
I've since found out the box is called the CCRM (constant control relay module), could this solve the problem?
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Saturday, May 7th, 2011 AT 4:30 AM
Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
Sounds like the electric radiator fan is not turning on when it is needed. It is not needed at higher speeds because the normal airflow through the radiator is sufficient without needing a fan.

First, spin the fan by hand to see if it is tight. It should spin freely. If it's tight, there's a good chance a fuse is blown too.

If it spins freely, next try swapping the fan relay with a different one like it. Two different versions are listed. If you have individual relays like the one shown below on the right, you can unplug it and switch it with a different one. If you have the box shown on the left, you will either have to perform electrical tests on it or the less-preferred method is to just plug in a different one to try it. Sorry I can't tell you where that part lives in your car but I'm sure it will be under the hood.
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Saturday, May 7th, 2011 AT 5:03 AM
Tiny
WRENCHTECH
  • EXPERT
This car doesn't use individual relays, it uses a CCRM located next to the battery as you were informed at the other site.
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Saturday, May 7th, 2011 AT 1:01 PM
Tiny
KCOLVIN8374
  • MEMBER
Well it turns out it was just a simple temp sender for only $20. Now the fans turn on! Any thoughts on why the A/C and heater are not working? There is no leakage from the heater core
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Monday, May 9th, 2011 AT 6:05 AM
Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
That's impossible to say without being able to see the car and make tests. What doesn't work about the heater? Do you get a little warm air but the heater fan doesn't run? Fan runs but only blows cold air? Do the modes switch between floor and defrost?

What doesn't work with the AC? Does the compressor run? Does everything work except it blows warm air? Has anyone checked to see if the system is low on charge? Ford uses a type of metal hose connector with an o-ring that commonly leaks. If enough refrigerant leaks out, a low-pressure cutout switch will prevent the compressor from turning on.
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Monday, May 9th, 2011 AT 7:24 AM
Tiny
KCOLVIN8374
  • MEMBER
For both instances, air blows out of the vents, but just at whatever temp it is inside the car. The fan will blow at all 4 speeds. I can change from defrost and floor, and everything in between.
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Tuesday, May 10th, 2011 AT 1:32 AM
Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
For the heater, once the engine is warmed up, feel the two heater hoses under the hood. They should be too hot to hold onto for very long. If they are not hot, either the heater core is plugged, the coolant level is low or there is an air pocket that hasn't burped out yet. If they ARE hot, suspect a problem with the doors and actuators inside the heater box in the dash.

The AC compressor won't turn on if the refrigerant charge is low. That is done to prevent the possibility of sucking in moisture with outside air if there is a leak. Moisture from humidity in the air and traces of remaining refrigerant combine to form hydrochloric acid. That's why mechanics always suck the system into a vacuum to remove any moisture before adding refrigerant.

First they will check to see if the charge really is low. If it is, they will add just enough to run the compressor so they can search for a leak. Due to the age of the car, there may not be a leak big enough to find and repair. The refrigerant could have likely just leaked out slowly over time. That is common. If that is the case, recharging the system will restore it to normal operation.
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Tuesday, May 10th, 2011 AT 3:26 AM

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