Mechanics

DODGE DURANGO ABS PROBLEM

2002 Dodge Durango • 130,000 miles

I have a 2002 Dodge Durango that the ECM has gone bad. It had a part number of P56040331AB. I got an ECM unit with a part number of P56040482AB, but when I try it in the car, the car starts, runs for about 2 seconds, then turns itself off.

Can this ECM be programed to work in my Durango or does it HAVE to be the EXACT same part number?

Thanks in advance for your help!
AD
Avatar
Nct53
March 23, 2013.



Hello caradiodoc!

I want to thank you again for taking the time to help me on this ECM problem. Rebuilt a lot of engines when I was young, but never got into all this new computer stuff.

So, I will NOT need a 4 digit pin, just plug it in, and it should work?

I have found out that there were 3 revisions to my ECM unit.
Original: P56040331AB
1st. Rev: P56040331AC
2nd. Rev. RL040331AC
3rd. Rev. R6040331AC

So when I go looking for a replacement part, should I ONLY accept one of the above numbers, or do I just have to make sure it came from a Durango with a 5.9L engine?

What year range would still work?

What if it came from, lets say, a 2002 Ram truck with a 5.9L engine?

Just want to be sure I know what to tell people I need, and what to be willing to accept before I shell out another couple of hundred dollars!

Thanks again!

Tiny
Nct53
Apr 8, 2013.
More Information: I have had trouble locating one of the actual part numbers listed (like the original P56040331AB), but have found several with the part number of P56040330AB.

The only difference is the last number before the letters "AB" which is a "0" instead of a "1". Do you think one of these will work?

Thanks again!

- Noel
AD

Tiny
Nct53
Apr 8, 2013.
I just found out that the ECM I have with the part number of; P56040331AB, that the "1" is for California emissions. The part number I am able to find which is P56040330AB is for Federal emissions.

Is there enough difference in the parts they put into the California version of the Durango to make the "0" ECM unit not workable?

Thanks again!

Tiny
Nct53
Apr 8, 2013.
You're into stuff I can't answer now. Years ago California required additional systems on cars sold there that required the Engine Computer to be able to control them so they were different. Today most of the rest of the country has equally stringent regulations so those systems are already in use and the only difference in computers is some internal programming. Some engines from the early 2000s didn't have EGR valves so the computers for the 49 states would not have built-in monitors for that. I would avoid a computer from a California truck if you aren't in that state.

According to my friend who rebuilds smashed Chrysler products, he has never concerned himself with part numbers. He buys front clips for the body parts, then saves things like wire harnesses and computers to replace those that are smashed from a crash. He says if it came from a 2002 Durango, it will work in a 2002 Durango. As far as working on or from a truck, you would have to compare the connectors. If they're different in size, shape, location of key ways, or number of wires, they were made different for a reason and they won't interchange. If the plugs are the same there was no reason to make them different because there was no reason to worry about someone plugging in the wrong one. Still, if I was working on it I would want to compare the charts in the service manuals. The full-size trucks are different than the Dakotas so they will have different service manuals. The Durango is based on the Dakota but they still each have their own service manuals. You would have to go down the list in each manual, one for your truck and one for the donor vehicle, and look at the diagrams for the proper engine sizes, to see if the wire locations and functions are the same. If they are I would have no worries about plugging it in.

Do an internet search for "Pull-A-Part" and see if they have a yard near you. They have 23 between Ohio and southern Georgia. I've been to 16 of them. All are very clean and well-organized, employees and customers are real friendly, and parts are inexpensive. You pay your buck, throw your tool box in one of their wheel barrows, and you can spend all day there. A 2002 model is right on the edge of what they will typically have in their yards because they don't buy insurance wrecks. They only have what people bring in. My list is a few years old but they were charging $32.00 for a computer, ... Less if you didn't want a warranty.

Caradiodoc
Apr 9, 2013.
Again, thanks for your reply,

I live in DFW Texas, and Pull-A-Part doesn't have any locations here.

I did find a place that has re-manufactured units and they pre-program them with the VIN number and milage before they send it, so it is completely "Plug-N-Play" and one doesn't have to take it to a dealer service to get it programed after installing it.

There price for the one I need is $199, and I have had quotes from wrecking yards as high as $350.

Will wait to hear from a few more yards, but will probably go with them after talking with them tomorrow.

Tiny
Nct53
Apr 9, 2013.
Hi, I have a 2002 Dodge Durgano that the ECM was replaced with a used one. Its telling us that it needs a code/pin # and we can not figure out why? Does this ECM come with a PROM (memory chip) that perhaps needs to be put into the ECM that we are installing? I read a lot on the anti theft. Not sure if it's that. It's been sitting for two months and no one seems to know how to fix it. Any help would be so appreciated! It's a perfect truck except for the ECM which seems to only need a code. Help please!

Tiny
Specialkcush
Sep 3, 2013.
I don't know how this got overlooked but I'm sorry I didn't reply sooner. When you replace a computer with the four-digit pin number, you connect the Chrysler DRB3 scanner to retrieve the number from the old computer, then install that number into the new computer. If you no longer have the old computer, the dealer's parts department can get it for you. I'm on very good terms with the one I used to work for so they do that for me for free. Most dealers will not do that for people they don't know because it's a security-related code number. They will want the vehicle and often some type of proof of ownership.

Caradiodoc
Jan 19, 2014.
Hello Caradiodoc!

Well, I am glad you responded this late because it reminded me I needed to let everyone know what happened.

YES, I got the Durango running!

I ordered a rebuilt ECM from the company I mentioned earlier Called CarComputerExchange. Com. They pre-programed it for my car, and when I plugged it in (following their instructions) the Durango started right up!

But there was a problem. The ABS warning light kept flashing every second, and an annoying "ding" kept being sounded. I Put up with that for awhile as I continued contacting people to find out why.

I took it to a local mechanic referred to me, and he put it on a "bigger" computer then what Autozone has. He told me he was getting three error codes that said "tire code" and it was 712, "axle code" and it was 9.25, and some pinon ring code, but he didn't know what to do to "fix" them.

After a few more conversations with Car Computer Exchange and the first mechanic, it became clear that there was some "code" that needed to be programed into the associated "brains". I became aware that when hot rod shops rig out a truck or something with big tires, they have to do some programing of the vehicle. I believed my ABS problem was related.

I then took it to a Dodge dealership, and they had their 24 year veteran mechanic look at it.

He came back and said I needed a new ABS module. I told the service adviser to have him go back and look again. All the Durango needed was to have proper information programed into one of the above mentioned code areas. I was adamant about this.

About 1/2 hour later, I was told the Durango was fixed. All he had to do was program in the proper tire size. (Cost, $95.00)

I don't know if this was a "dumb" mechanic, or just a hungry one, but I was pretty surprised when he decided I needed a new ABS module (of course, very expensive!).

Well, I hope knowing the rest of this story helps you and others deal with similar situations.

Thanks again for all your input and attempts to help!

- Noel

Tiny
Nct53
Jan 19, 2014.
Happy to hear it's solved. Don't be too hard on that last mechanic. He reached the logical conclusion based on what he knew. There is nothing that can happen to the ABS Computer to make it lose its programming. Disconnecting the battery and changing other parts won't affect it. For that reason, when tire size is wrong, and especially when axle ratio is also wrong, he has to suspect someone changed those settings or the computer has a problem. He knows that if someone changed the settings, they knew what they were doing and they would have set them correctly. If you came in with the ABS light on right after changing tires, you would have told them that, and re-programming is the first thing he would have looked at. Since he was of the impression nothing had changed recently, the computer would be his first suspect.

Caradiodoc
Jan 19, 2014.
Page 2 of 2

AD