Mechanics

WHICH RADIATOR DO I GET

2000 Mitsubishi Eclipse • 4 cylinder 2WD Manual • 150,000 miles

I have a crack in my radiator and need a new one. Here's the weird part. I no longer have a the model info (month and year of make) on my drivers side door frame, so no one seems to be able to help me with a sale. I've read that it really makes no difference whether I get the one for automatic or manual transmission but I have no clue. Outside of calling the dealership what are my options if any?
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As long as the physical size is correct, it doesn't matter. The radiator for an automatic has a cooler built into one tank for the transmission. You just don't use those ports if you don't need them.

You only have to use the one for an automatic if you have an automatic transmission.

Caradiodoc
Apr 6, 2011.
Thanks again!

By "not using the ports" I'm assuming that means I'd have to secure them so they're not open? How do I do that?

Nope, just ignore them. They are the two ends of a metal tube, nothing more.

Caradiodoc
Apr 6, 2011.
PROBLEM!
I reinstalled the radiator exactly as I removed it, refilled it with fluid and within 5 minutes of starting the car it started overheating. Thermostat? Upper hose is extremely hot and under a great deal of pressure. Bottom hose. Cold and under no pressure. Again, thermostat? Where is the thermostat and how do I check it? If this isn't the culprit what could it be?

Ok so I replaced the thermostat anyway, upper hose has less pressure and heat, but car is still close to the overheat line when driving at slow speeds. In addition my hearter no longer puts out heat? One thing after another lol

There might be a real easy fix. (Fingers crossed). Remove the hoses from the radiator and check the tubes for a plastic plug that was supposed to be removed. I saw a very experienced mechanic miss one because it was painted over and he slid the hose right over it.

Caradiodoc
Apr 7, 2011.
Unfortunately that wasn't it : (. Next step?

After rereading everything, you might have an air pocket that has to be bled out. Thermostats will not open in response to hot air; they have to be hit with hot coolant.

Look around the thermostat housing, (under the thermostat, not above it), for a screwed-in plug or temperature sensor that can be removed long enough to bleed the air out. You might have to add some coolant to the radiator to bring the level up in the engine.

Caradiodoc
Apr 7, 2011.