Mechanics

MERCURY MARQUIS BATTERY PROBLEM

1970 Mercury Marquis • 200,000 miles

I am working on a 70 mercury maquis 429 4b brougham, I rebuilt the engine, and rewired the entire car, and I am in the process of replacing the exhaust system, however I ran into a problem, when my friend was disconnecting the engine from the rest of the car, he disconnected the vacuum lines without telling me where they went or marking them, the manual he has covers 20 years of this car and does not include the proper vacuum diagrams, the engine is running soundly, however the vacuum line for the transmission is missing, so it has trouble moving at low speeds, I need help figuring out the where the vacuum line for the transmission goes, I cannot find any place for it, I found where it connects to the transmission, but cannot find where it connects to the engine, Please help! Thank you
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Papajohnslice
November 28, 2012.




That hose goes to the plastic multiple tee on the middle of the firewall. Actually, it can connect to or tap into anything tied directly to intake manifold vacuum.


Caradiodoc
Nov 28, 2012.
That's what a needed to know, thanks! And now I realize why I didn't think of that, my friend must have lost the rubber hose and I was looking for a rubber hose for the metal line to connect to, welp thanks friend!


Tiny
Papajohnslice
Nov 28, 2012.
Now I do have another problem, for some odd reason the battery keeps getting drained down, at first it got fried do to a jumper wire on the starter being improperly installed (by my friend I might add) well I fixed that problem but the battery still looses it's charge over night, any suggestions? (No lights are being left on and the wiring is hooked up correctly)


Tiny
Papajohnslice
Nov 28, 2012.
I'm going to have to do this from memory because I don't have a service manual for your car. First of all, unplug the voltage regulator and see if that solves the drain. Some often-overlooked things to check include a cigarette lighter stuck on, (it will overheat and a thermal circuit breaker will cycle on and off), a glove box light staying on, an aftermarket radio wired incorrectly, and a sticking power seat switch.

If you don't find anything like that, you'll need to insert an ammeter between one of the battery posts and its cable to read the current, then unplug fuses to see which one has the draw. Measuring the drain gets real complicated to explain in newer cars with computers, but yours will be straightforward and easy. Do you have a digital volt-ohm meter?


Caradiodoc
Nov 28, 2012.
Yes I a multimeter, and I just replaced the voltage meter, it has no after market stereo system, and the cigarette lighter doesn't work, however I will test every thing possible that I can, thanks for the help and I will report back with my results!


Tiny
Papajohnslice
Nov 28, 2012.
And wait a second, what kind of mechanic wouldn't have a multimeter?


Tiny
Papajohnslice
Nov 28, 2012.
You'd be surprised. I have over a dozen from my 35-plus years as a tv / vcr repairman, and I used two at the Chrysler dealership where I was their only suspension and alignment expert. It was there that I saw about half of the guys didn't own a meter or know how to use one. In fact, their AC expert had to retire early because he couldn't keep up with the new technology. To quote him exactly when working on an automatic temperature control problem, "I don't understand it; I have 12 volts on both sides of the motor and it still doesn't run"!

Later, as an instructor, I made sure every one of my kids understood electrical theory and troubleshooting. Two of my former students are working today at one of my city's top automotive electrical repair shops, and one of them taught the owner a couple of things. With good electrical skills, you can go anywhere and find a job.


Caradiodoc
Nov 28, 2012.
Haha well that is very true, and kind of surprising that some mechanics and electrical engineers don't have them, well I ran some tests turns out the alternator wire going to the solenoid, it was on the wrong side, however, when I put it towards the other side, the alternator doesn't work, I tried connecting it with and without a fusible link, but it hasn't made a difference, I know for a fact the alternator is draining the battery when it is connected to the positive side of the solenoid, but the alternator will not work when it is on the opposing side, not to mention, when I disconnected the battery to test the alternator, the terminal (negative on the battery) sparked allot and the car backfired, the only time I have seen this is when the battery was connected backwards, but it is set up the exact way it was before I rebuilt the engine, any suggestions?
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Tiny
Papajohnslice
Nov 29, 2012.
I also had the alternator tested at o'reilys just to make sure and it passed 3 times, and the battery was tested as well at is good.


Tiny
Papajohnslice
Nov 29, 2012.
Please don't disconnect the battery cable while the engine is running. That was a trick done many years ago by mechanics who didn't understand how these systems work. On newer cars it's real easy to damage a lot of computers if the voltage goes too high. The battery is the key component in helping the voltage regulator maintain a safe system voltage.

What kind of voltage regulator do you have? I found a '71 book that shows one with the common fender-mounted regulator and one with it built into the generator. They don't show wiring diagrams though.


Caradiodoc
Nov 30, 2012.

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